In Training & Honcho: A Leather-Encouraged Evening Together

CLEVELAND – IN TRAINING is pleased to announce that we are partnering with our good friends HONCHO to bring you:

“A Leather-Encouraged Evening Together”

10p – 6a / $15 / Location TBA / Must RSVP to attend

An all-night semi-private party for friends and revelers to dance, unwind and release!

For years, Pittsburgh’s premiere LGBT dance night HONCHO has staked their reputation on the unmatched caliber of their flesh-soaked, sweat-drenched undergrounds at infamous bathhouse & dancefloor HOT MASS. We have spent a long time courting them for a playdate in Cleveland and are thrilled that they’ll be gracing (and greasing) our presence. To make this event extra-special, we will be throwing it in a space that allows us to party until the cold shame of morning!

Featuring music from 10 pm to 6 am from HONCHO & IN TRAINING DJs:

Aaron Clark
Clark Price
D’Adhemar
Father Of Two

In order to keep our gathering intimate and safe from prying eyes, we encourage all the attendees to email us to RSVP at:

ITxHONCHO@gmail.com

YOU MUST INCLUDE YOUR NAME to be on the list! If you would prefer to give a name other than the one on a form of Identification, please let us know and we will accommodate your request. Attendees on the RSVP list will receive the address via reply.

Our venue is a large, modern space near the city center, easily-accessible by rideshare. There will be ample well-lit parking and venue security attuned to the needs of our attendees.

This event will cost $15, a portion of which will be donated to The Sisters Of Perpetual Indulgence, a long-running national LGBTQ organization that uses drag performances to fundraise for HIV/AIDS programs.

Feel free to email or message us with any questions / comments at ITxHONCHO@gmail.com

Let us sweat together!

Signal > Noise v.3.0: Sassmouth, Shawn Rudiman, Aaron Clark

ROCHESTER – Signal > Noise celebrates their birthday with three beasts: Pittsburgh’s Aaron Clark and Shawn Rudiman and Chicago’s Sassmouth.

Perhaps no one else is as responsible for putting Pittsburgh on the map recently like AARON CLARK. If you’ve been plugged into the scene over the past several years, you’ve undoubtedly caught wind of the throbbing, sweaty techno revival happening there, at one of the events Aaron helps curate and promote with his crew Humanaut (recently celebrating their 10th-year anniversary!) and the notorious queer collective of which he’s an integral part, Honcho. What you may not know is the dancefloor weapon that Aaron Clark is when he gets behind the decks. Dynamic, subterranean beats mixed with maturity and surgical precision is what Aaron brings to whatever sound system he rocks, be it Berghain in Berlin or Rochester’s Signal>Noise.


Chicago’s Sam Kern, aka SASSMOUTH is the jet-setting queen bee of the American underground techno/house scene. Her reassuring presence and constant hard work on so many fronts has helped energize, catalyze and unify the U.S. scene. Sam’s passion for dance music and its lifestyle is unquestionable. She runs the always-on-point God Particle record label, is a resident DJ at Chicago’s Smartbar and San Francisco’s As You Like It, and with the Naughty Bad Fun Collective, is responsible for one of the most beloved events during Movement weekend in Detroit every year, Industry Brunch. Besides all this, Sam is an absolutely incredible DJ, and a simply wonderful human being whom we cherish and are thrilled to have back in Rochester, which is somehow still standing after her last appearance here in 2014

Pittsburgh’s SHAWN RUDIMAN is part-man, part-animal, and part-machine (he can also be quite the party animal, but that’s another story). Shawn annihilated the Signal>Noise dancefloor upon his last visit with the explosive 100% hardware live performance that he is renowned for worldwide. Many in-the-know techno-heads everywhere regard his as the best live techno PA on the planet, and we at Signal>Noise unanimously agree. Shawn has been a staple in the world techno community for almost two decades, playing at clubs, raves and festivals like Tresor and Movement Detroit regularly. You simply haven’t witnessed the pure, unadulterated fury of techno until you’ve witnessed Shawn Rudiman and his machines raging at full blast. on a killer sound system.

<<< DJ LINEUP >>>
————————————————————————————
Aaron Clark
[Honcho | Humanaut PGH]

Sassmouth
[God Particle | Smartbar CHI]

Shawn Ruidman
[Detroit Techno Millitia | God Particle | 7th City]

<<< PARTY ESSENTIALS >>>
————————————————————————————
Saturday > January 28
45 Euclid > Rochester > NY
[10PM – 4AM]
21+ w/ID

Aaron Clark

Sweaty bodies, a wall of lights and a sound system that pulls you in and won’t let go. If you have experienced Hot Mass, you understand. Aaron Clark, co-founder of the Pittsburgh party, is in charge of co-curating resident nights Honcho and Humanaut at the after hours spot. 

While growing up in Ohio, Clark wasn’t very active in the music scene. Mostly a bedroom DJ he says “I was still coming out of the closet and trying to pull away from my church. Once I turned 18 I started to hit the parties happening at Red Zone in Columbus and Moda in Cleveland.” Shortly thereafter he moved to Pittsburgh for university, unfortunately right when the city’s rave scene was in a lull.

When it comes to Clark’s background as a DJ, he says “I sort of tripped into it.” He would hear electronic tracks in the background of commercials and scour the internet to identify them, which would turn out to be “stupid stuff like Chemical Brothers. This was Napster days, so I’d download that stuff, but then realize that people made remixes of these things, which led me to more underground producers. It was kind of a rabbit hole situation,” he says. “I know a lot of people don’t believe in folks coming in from the commercial side of dance and landing in a good place musically, but it happens.” In high school he was introduced to his friend’s boyfriend, Rob, who had a full DJ setup and PA. This piqued Clark’s interest and pulled him to the performance side of electronic music which he says “really helped me start separating quality from bullshit.”

Before Hot Mass became one of the most prominent parties for today’s scene Clark spent about eight years throwing large scale events. While seeking a place to throw small after parties for their main events they stumbled upon Club Pittsburgh, a private men’s bath house located in the city’s historic Strip District. The space is relatively small, with small dark spaces for private encounters. 

HOT MASS – PITTSBURGH

He reminisced about the beginning stages of their parties in the bath house. “When we first checked it out, we weren’t even sure how to use it. The space was super weird, not laid out in any sensical way for dancing, lots of hallways and cruisey rooms (as part of the bath house) but we could go late. So we took it, and had Kirk Degiorgio play a second set after his first one. It went off! I think we pulled the plug on a full dance floor that morning around 8 a.m.? Up to that point we would struggle to hold a crowd until 4 a.m. max. We were all really blown away by the crazy energy that room had, so we kept going with it.”

John McMarlin, manager of Club Pittsburgh, proposed that the after party events become a weekly which ultimately brought Hot Mass to fruition. Clark says, “That sounded insane to us, as everyone knows how impossible it is to keep a weekly party going. It’s torture. The idea was that maybe we could pull it off if we had four separate crews as part of the larger collective, and we all took a different week so we didn’t burn out.”

Hot Mass as a whole is comprised by four parts: Honcho, Humanaut, Detour and Cold Cuts. Each Saturday of the month is accounted for. Honcho is held the first Saturday followed by Humanaut on the second. The city’s record label collective Detour showcases the third Saturday and new to the roster is Cold Cuts, an event which curates an affinity for disco and hoagies on week four. I inquired how each of these facets play a significant role not only within their space but also to the scene at large. “This is a tough one to answer. I think all four crews touch different sounds of dance. Humanaut heads straight to techno, Honcho loops in the gays and does all genres, Detour is heavy on live sets as they’re so production-minded due to their label, and Cold Cuts is just a great fucking time. It’s positivity music,” Clark says. “You kinda touch all corners, and funnel everyone into one club together, making it easier for people to figure out what they like and dig deeper. Ideally, we are always giving up-and-comers a shot on the decks as well. It’s something I personally want to push further in 2017.”

HONCHO – PTTSBURGH

The four crews work together to maintain the integrity of the space and progress the continuity of energy and quality talent.

“We’d all vote on the larger rules of the club, keep the door cover consistent, and operate under a unified brand – Hot Mass,” he continues. “We wanted the general public in Pittsburgh to think ‘it’s always a good time there’ and not get hung up on who was promoting the party. Amazingly enough, it worked. And over the past four years we’ve just tried to improve the place one piece at a time as we got the money, knocking out walls, moving the dance floor, new sound.”

But what exactly is it that makes this Pennsylvania party so special? The size of the space is small bringing an inherent intimacy to any party. Sexuality here is open and free and there is an undeniable consistent energy when you make it until 7 a.m. and those lights turn on. “It still feels crazy that we have this beautiful thing. I think being attached to the bath house (Club Pittsburgh) is incredibly important. Right out of the gate, it’s a gay space. That helps with crowd quality immensely and is really an inseparable part of it all. Once you have that base layer, you add the layers of good friends, techno heads, and out-of-towners coming through each week,” he says.

Honcho was established in 2012 while Humanaut was founded in 2005 and run by the collective efforts of Clark, Paul Fleetwood, Paul “Relative Q” Zyla, Benjamin Kessler and Tony Fairchild. Through both Honcho and Humanaut the floor of Hot Mass has seen talent from the likes of Bill Converse, Derek Plaslaiko, Shawn Rudiman, The Black Madonna, Claude Young, Ectomorph, Bicep, DJ Minx, Sassmouth, and so many more. Last summer Clark assisted hosting a Honcho Summer Campout in the West Virginia woods and sometimes you can catch a set by Honcho, which is comprised (give or take) by Clark, George d’Adhemar, and Clark Price.

“[Hot Mass] is one of the only places in town where different peoples bubbles crash into each other. Pittsburgh is not known for being a diverse place, which can feel suffocating at times. Hot Mass is a bit of an antidote to that.” – AARON CLARK

The dance floor at Hot Mass is one of which that allows freedom, tests your limits, breaks borders and pushes boundaries. There is no pretension, and with Club Pittsburgh’s environment these parties bring everyone together by serving to both the gay and straight community. Clark believes that these attributes of a party are “important because these moments don’t happen enough. As we’ve all seen, everyone is content to live in their own personal bubble these days. Gay people need to party with straight people, and vice versa.” He explains that this outcome won’t happen at a typical gay club which serves mostly as a place to get drunk. “I think the important part here is that there’s something for everyone to bond over other than a bar – the music.”

aaron clark

AARON CLARK – PHOTO COURTESY OF THUMP

When he’s not bringing in talent or throwing down sets himself, Clark can be found working as a Cultural Engineer at the Ace Hotel in downtown Pittsburgh. Through this position he wears many hats working with community relationships, marketing, event programming and social media. “I was attracted to it because I had respected the Ace brand for years, and I wanted to force myself outside of my comfort zone of just throwing techno parties.” Through this avenue they are collaborating with The Andy Warhol Museum, hosting independent markets and panel discussions, as well as pop-up dinners. Although a small component of what he does at Ace, Clark incorporates small music events at the hotel, with an occasional Hot Mass day party outside.

No matter what Clark does, both day and night, his love and drive for music will run deep and with passion. “Music is one of the only things that can overtake my emotions completely. I remember one time at a Bunker show in NYC, Magic Mountain High was playing live. My partner and I had just gotten to the club, completely sober. We’re standing on the dance floor and we just started crying. The music was so beautiful, it was involuntary. That’s really cool. There’s a lot of beautiful stuff in the world, but music consistently does crazy things like this, over and over again.”

Catch Aaron Clark make his Western New York debut on Saturday for the two year anniversary party of Rochester’s Signal > Noise.

Gay Marvine

Born and raised in Michigan, the youthful Chuck Hampton (otherwise known as Gay Marvine) could be found turning the dial to explore all that Detroit radio had to offer. Driving his family crazy by constantly tuning into disco stations, he fell in love. From that point forward he used his finely tuned ear and spent his creative energy to share that love with the rest of the world.

What is it about that disco sound? “The bass! The beat! I loved the repetition of the groove. These things all spoke to me, and I couldn’t understand how some people didn’t get it,” he says.

The genre, which was generationally pivotal, had some historically dark times. During an infamous baseball game between the Chicago White Sox and the Detroit Tigers on July 12, 1979, disco arguably became a scapegoat for sexual and racial discrimination. Disco Demolition Night was meant to be a promotional event put on by the Chicago team at Comiskey Park. During the rally attendees brought a record to the game and during the doubleheaders intermission the vinyl was destroyed by an explosion on the field. There were 50,000 people in attendance that day and a riot ensued. More than 5,000 people took to the field to set fire to the records.

Yet, disco prevailed and remained a foundation for music thereon in. Hampton reminisced about his early clubbing days which took place shortly after that time. “Detroit area gay clubs played such great music in the ’80s,” he says. During which he said he would hear alternative sounds such as Ministry, Siouxsie and the Banshees, in addition to popular hits and Hi-NRG tracks. “Then house and techno happened. It changed everything! We had the greats – Ken Collier, Derrick May, D-Wynn, Richie Hawtin – and so many more. They took it all to a higher level. All of this rich variety influenced me as a DJ and how I hear music.”

This mentality brought a complexity and a focused approach to Hampton’s creativity. The inspiration really began through Secret Mixes Fixes, a label for edits, which was started around 2005 by Brendan Gillen of Interdimensional Transmissions. Hampton says, “He and I are good friends, and at that time we were neighbors. I was always hanging out at his place, listening to records. He showed me this new program called Ableton Live that he started using for his DJ sets. It inspired me to create edits of some of my favorite records for him to use in his sets; records that I couldn’t use un-edited in my sets. I played a few for him and he loved them, said he’d like to put them out on Secret Mixes Fixes. Then all of a sudden I had done like 50+ edits! So we created Bath House Etiquette as an outlet for my output. BMG still runs the label and he takes care of getting stuff pressed.”

 

Bath House Etiquette now has nine volumes of 12” records filled with groovy basslines and soul lifting vocals.
“For me, editing is all about mining for the funk, and trimming the fat off. Some things that were in the old disco records were superfluous, and distracted from the wicked groove that was happening underneath. Also, I was heavily influenced by disco house records of the ’90s. I love how repetitive they were, but sometimes I wanted just a little more of the original in there and a little less of what was added. I’d say the most evocative of my edits is ‘Anxiety Into Ecstasy’.” — GAY MARVINE

According to the label, “Bath House Etiquette is a manual on how to handle Gay Discos. Everyone needs a little inside information. Follow the stairs to the basement, wait on your knees by the sling and wait for Mr. Marvine (to you) for further instructions.”

There is a raw and visceral energy that takes place in a bathhouse that can definitely emanate through Hampton’s tracks and the sets he puts out. Hampton says, “I think bathhouses represent hedonism. Unbridled sexuality, sensuality.” Beneath a bathhouse in downtown Pittsburgh, Penn. you will find after-hours venue Hot Mass. Aaron Clark booked Hampton as the very first guest for Honcho, a monthly gay party held at that venue, in February 2013.

According to Clark, Hampton is now deemed an unofficial Honcho resident. “We’ve done a lot of parties with him already and plan to do a lot more this year,” he says. “The Honcho sound is pretty diverse, it can disco just as well as it can whip the club into acid house and techno. Chuck really nails all of those sounds. He’s the guest DJ that always feels the most at home with us.”

Beyond the bathhouse and deeper into the music, Gay Marvine helps provide a place that is unlike any other. What makes his set special is “the energy and the celebratory vibe of the music. Even if it’s tougher sounds, it’s always happy. It sounds like family, and the club feels like family,” Clark says.

This environment is a beautiful place that prevails through dark times and embraces positivity. Disco, house and techno inherently inspire energy, liberation and fearless expression. For Hampton, “[music] heals my soul, it brings me joy, it gives me solace, it soothes me, it makes me want to fuck, it makes me dance!”

In celebration of the music and Rochester Pride, Signal > Noise and Sole Rehab will host Gay Marvine at the revamped 45 Euclid on Saturday along with Honcho resident d’Adhemar.