The Bunker New York
15 Years In The Making

The Bunker New York is more than just a party. It is a world-traveling, party machine that is connecting people and creating relationships through music curation and production. What started out as an intimate basement rave has grown to become a staple in the techno world.

It’s mission? To push the limits of what techno can be.

THE ORIGIN

The Bunker’s origin story begins in 1995 with Rod Smith and Mike Wolf throwing parties called the Polar Bear Club in Minneapolis, Minn. These lounge parties had a “free-for-all” approach when it came to music programming. Chris Sattinger [Timeblind] eventually became resident after bonding with Wolf while working at Rev 105 FM.

Sattinger reflects on the early days of PBC. “I remember going to one in 7th Street Entry with tables and tablecloths and everybody dressed up formally. They played lounge and exotica which was a really interesting thing to do in a grunge bar. After a while they veered into deeper weirder music (both Rod and Mike are deep and weird). I DJed at some events that Rod set up in 7th Street Entry. Rod was also involved with Depth Probe and the acid and techno parties that Kevin Cole pioneered. Even in the late ‘80s those guys were throwing acid house parties in warehouses.”

TONIC, 107 NORFOLK STREET, MANHATTAN

In early 2000 Wolf moved to New York City and started the East Coast chapter of the party; Sattinger soon followed. The party continued in the basement of Tonic on Norfolk Street, a Lower East Side venue that was once a kosher winery. The main floor of the space was home to a variety of shows. Polar Bear Club nights (which were known for eclectic sound) were held in the venue’s basement, subTonic. The space itself was a freeform, dirty underground with plenty of room to chill or dance. The DJ booth was crafted from wine barrels that someone cut a door into.

Enter Pittsburgh native Bryan Kasenic who moved to the city when he was 19 in 1997 to study filmmaking at New York University. In the early 2000s he was booking parties for Openair and at Halcyon on Smith Street, he was assisting with theAgriculture Records, as well as putting on warehouse parties. He explored sound while working as a music director and hosting two shows for WNYU radio.

On his radio show Beyond he would read a list of events to highlight local parties. These listings would also be sent out to emails which he collected the old-fashioned way – by paying someone to take a clipboard out to parties to gather contacts. As a regular at subTonic he was consistently pushing the venue’s events, which got him on the Polar Bear Club’s radar.

Sattinger and Wolf invited Kasenic to play at one of their final parties as a thank you for helping to promote their events. Eventually, Wolf left the Polar Bear Club in the hands of Sattinger. Although the eclectic sound brought an energy of unpredictable fun to the table, he was inspired to keep a consistent and steady dancefloor which meant more focused programming. He asked Kasenic (monikered Spinoza) to become a resident for this new endeavor. In January 2003, The Bunker was born.

Becoming The Bunker

I honestly can’t remember a ton about that gig, but I know I got some people to the party and there was dancing, which I think maybe convinced Timeblind I should be his new co-resident,” Kasenic says about his first time playing a PBC party. “I just remember being super stoked when Chris asked me to join him to throw the new weekly! subTonic was my regular hang and after four years of having a Sunday residency playing chillout music at Halcyon, I was pretty excited to have the opportunity to do a more late night Friday thing that had a small dancefloor.”

Until 3 a.m. the inaugural party brought the sounds of Radius and Paul Patterson. The description: “Tonight is the debut of the Bunker, a new weekly party I’m throwing with Timeblind. Timeblind and I will be playing eclectic ecstatic sounds that you can shake your ass too (or sit in an old wine cask and zone out to … the choice is yours).”

EARLY BUNKER FLYERS

The party’s new name was inspired by the atmosphere of subTonic – a dark, bunker-like basement. It became a favorite for so many because it was an affordable spot with a different vibe, a good crowd, and a meeting ground for great music; a recipe for regulars who considered the space as a second home of sorts. Kasenic says, “It was underground and it really did feel like a bunker. Now, if I knew that The Bunker would become my life’s work, I think I would have given it more thought and tried to come up with something more unique (there are a lot of techno Bunkers around the world), but at the time we were very excited when we picked the name.”

He continues, “I think the early days of The Bunker, we were very much in the spirit of the vibe and musical direction of PBC. We kept things very eclectic. We always knew things would have more of a techno / dance music slant though as that was very much a common ground between Timeblind (who was actually a Midwest techno legend) and I.”

klevervice

SHEL KIMEN [KLEVERVICE], 2008 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

Even though programming for the parties became more focused, they maintained a diverse range stretching anywhere from experimental to 4×4 heaters, and the sonic crevices in between. After Sattinger moved to Berlin in July 2003, Kasenic asked Karl Erhard [DJ Movement] and Shel Kimen [kleverVice] to join as residents.

Both residents of Undercity, Kimen and Kasenic met at the old Halcyon. “We started playing other parties together, mostly underground warehouse type things. And had a few trials with our own parties in random bars. I’d been a guest DJ at most of the Tonic parties including Polar Bear Club,” Kimen says. “It seemed like a natural evolution and it was super exciting. It was such an unusual space and known for experimentation, of every kind. So that was perfect for me. I could play noise and Dutch electro pop and Outkast and ‘70s German electronic in one night, in one set, and somehow it worked. I played early, kept things weird. And Bryan was/remains one of my musical shamans. He always finds the best of the best and played it in unique ways, regardless of genre. So it was a lot of fun.”

She reflects on those early days. “While we did have a few dead nights, pretty much something amazing happened every week. If the energy was right Bryan would tease the crowd with a record he would only play if the energy was right. And it was thrilling to watch people just go nuts. But I also liked when we started organizing the ‘rock’ parties upstairs and suddenly we had this extreme cross-over of audiences listening to Animal Collective or Japanther upstairs and accidentally ending up in a techno party downstairs. I honestly hadn’t seen this kind of crossover since Medussa’s in Chicago the ’80s.”

The bunker brings change and yet feels like ‘home.’ I think it has (at least) two really powerful dimensions. It is exceptionally progressive, knowing how to stay ahead and avoiding ‘trendy’ while respecting and honoring roots and the intimacy required for strong community. That feels pretty good to me.” – SHEL KIMEN

Bunker started to really pick up steam in 2004 as they incorporated both floors of Tonic. In September that year for Kasenic’s birthday the sounds of Dan Bell, Perlon’s Sammy Dee, Delia & Gavin, and Blood On The Wall took over the basement and main level of the venue. The crowds would mix and in turn would grow.

Derek Plaslaiko made the move to NYC by way of Detroit in the summer that year. The Bunker, he says, reminded him of early ‘90s raves in Detroit. “I don’t remember who played that night or anything like that. Somebody had brought me there, though I can’t quite recall who,” he says about his first Bunker. “I just went there and looked around and listened and was like, ‘This is where I want to be’. From the fact that it was in a pretty dirty basement, to the wine casks converted into semi-private seated areas: it just felt perfect!”

derek plaslaiko bryan kasenic

DEREK PLASLAIKO & BRYAN KASENIC, 2006

He was hooked. Plaslaiko was one of the first to arrive and one of the last to leave. Those early days “I liked how diverse the music was. That some nights you would go and get your face blown off with just fantastic dance music, and then on other nights it could be completely ambient/experimental. And the crowd that came embraced that! It really felt like the DIY aspect of the Detroit scene that I left behind to move to NYC.” This dedication (and blossoming friendship) brought Kasenic to ask Plaslaiko to be a resident.

In 2005 Ivy Feraco [Unjust] played at Bunker. “My friend Adrian Michna (from Secret Frequency Crew and Ghostly’s Michna) got me the gig. Bryan seemed to really enjoy the set I played and afterwards when I moved there, I think I played again and Bryan asked me to be a resident and help out – like when Bryan went out of town I’d host. From then on I was playing just about every week,” she says.

SubTonic, she says, “wasn’t very big and you could connect with the crowd easily. It was also unique in that it had wooden barrels which you could sit inside, and that also helped the acoustics.” The space was small and intimate – a bar with a dancefloor, she explained. “You knew you could easily meet with someone and hang with the people there. Bunker was a party where friends could meet and get loose to good music. People would just go every week to hang out drink and dance.”

Her list of favorite Bunker moments is extensive. “Some highlights were having heroes of mine like Akufen and Zip play the same night,” she says. “Prosumer playing ‘Funk Dat’ at a limited party? It felt very gratifying to hear that, like confirmation. Surgeon playing when the night was at Public Assembly and just playing an unreal set, going from Patrick Cowley to Moodymann. BMG DJing an unreal set at Trans Pecos. BMG and Sal Principato saying they enjoyed a set I played.”

Since her time with Bunker she has been living in NYC. She has continued playing parties like Electro Strikes Back before subTonic closed, as well as throwing two parties in the last year. She is working to move to Lima, Peru to “get more time to produce and keep speaking Spanish, but I hope to keep coming back to Brooklyn and Miami for friends, family and music.”

eric cloutier

ERIC CLOUTIER, 2006 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

More folks started to enter the fold around 2006 and the list of residents began to grow. After Eric Cloutier played Bunker in December that year he was convinced NYC is where he needed to be and one month later moved from Detroit to the city. “When I first started going out, and especially playing in Detroit, there was a serious energy and vibe to everything – a community of sorts, for one, but just wholehearted love for the music,” he says. “Part of the reason I left Detroit was because that all seemed to have faded away – people were growing up and moving on, moving out, getting kids and families and such – and when I went to play at subTonic I was like ‘holy shit, this is exactly what I’ve been missing.’ It just struck a huge chord with me and I had to get myself to where I was feeling more connected.”

Cloutier and Berlin’s Jan Krueger [Hello?Repeat] became residents in 2009. And although the Bunker family has grown exponentially over the years, the core residents of today include NYC-based Kasenic, Mike Servito, and Patrick Russell, with Plaslaiko and Cloutier hailing from Berlin. 

Being a resident of The Bunker means quite a lot. Not only has it been great to align with a New York techno institution, but also to join the ranks of talented residents Derek Plaslaiko, Mike Servito, and Eric Cloutier, who were all friends of mine back in Detroit. It just makes sense,” Russell says.

Cloutier adds, “It’s family at this point. Bryan’s been one of my closest friends since damn near the time I moved to NYC and still since I’ve left, but everyone that’s a part of The Bunker is a brother or sister at this juncture. I couldn’t be more proud to be a member of something I believe so strongly in and wear as a badge everywhere I go on this planet to play. I’m well aware of the responsibility and I would never want to let The Bunker down. And, to be honest, there’s a comedic irony that every single resident DJ, save for Bryan, is from Detroit, so…there’s that connection as well.”

But in 2006 there was one very influential person who joined the team: Seze Devres. Not only did she work the party as hostess but she was Bunker’s photographer and graphic designer. For years she documented every event, as well as created each flyer and poster.

The Look

Before her photography career really blossomed, Seze Devres was a freelance graphic and web designer for about 15 years. She originally taught herself HTML, WordPress, and Photoshop to promote her photography and party Kiss & Tell. Kasenic needed a designer so Devres stepped in to take on that role for Bunker.

“It was still a weekly party at subTonic then, I mostly used my own photography as a base and then we had multiple weeks listed in the same flyer. The initial images we used were my fine art work, abstract camera-less images, called photograms. They were very psychedelic images overlayed with blocky text. Eventually, I made a separate flyer for each party. Those were especially fun to make; I would take a new studio still-life image for each one. We would hang the new flyer at the party to announce the new lineup and it would be awesome to witness people’s excitement.”

seze devres

SEZE DEVRES, 2007

Looking back at the flyers now I am still pretty happy with the images I used even though the fonts seem kind of a bit dated to me now. My favorite flyers showcase my cats and botanical images, obviously. I also had a blast designing the Blood & Thunder flyers, a debaucherous New Years Eve 18-hour rager we threw a few times. I created an iconic crest for each DJ, which was great for the promotion. Another design I am especially fond of are the Unsound Festival postcards I created by scanning vintage Polish stamps from my stamp collection. I also really love the brutalist font and abstract grainy images I used for the Ostgut/Berghain residents collaboration we had.”

In addition to constructing the visual aesthetic of the parties she worked as Bunker’s photographer and hostess for ten years until her divorce with Kasenic. Devres became the eyes and mirror of the party’s dancefloor. She documented each party with photos, and would also take resident portraits in her at-home studio for visiting artists who would stay in their loft.

STUDIO PORTRAITS BY SEZE (CLOCKWISE FROM UPPER LEFT) ANTENES, TIN MAN, CARLOS SOUFFRONT, ERIKA, ROMANS, JUSTIN CUDMORE, MIKE SERVITO, ATOM AND TOBIAS

Taking photos at the party gave me really amazing creative outlet that defined how the party was represented online. It helped me socialize, feel less awkward at the party by giving me something to do or escape to. I often met people many years after I took their photo at the party. For most people who didn’t live in NY, it was a way for them to live vicariously through my photos. Shooting and editing the party photos every week really trained me to get super good at my craft and learn how to take well exposed photos in almost total darkness, even if I wasn’t remotely sober. I can take a photograph in any lighting situation now. Most of the time I caught people dancing and they were not even aware I was there. I was always respectful and tried not to post any unflattering images, since the guests were often high or deep in their dancing vibe. I even edited out some incriminating stuff, let’s leave it at that,” she says with a laugh.

But as Bunker began to evolve and grow, as did she. “Social media started to consume us more, and people wanted to tune out, dance, and become more anonymous when they went out. The need for the photos of each party seemed less relevant,” she says. The audience became more concentrated with “heads” and nightlife photographers became more popular which made her role feel less special. Eventually, “I wanted to just go to the party and enjoy myself without having to carry my precious camera and worry about taking photos all the time.”

She adds, “I have a photo of almost every single artist that played The Bunker. My images have spanned through so many avenues and it is wonderful to be a part of the fabric of the music I love and enjoy so much. I am proud to have this huge archive of images, and it also helps me trigger my memory of what happened each night.”

Not only did she experience the ebbs and flows of the party itself, Devres was witness to the growth of Bunker’s infrastructure. “I loved seeing younger guests eventually start to make music influenced by the party and become quite successful. Kids who would help Bryan carry speakers and break down at the end of the night became residents and some are now artists on the label. Basically if you want to be a part of something, roll up your sleeves and help make it happen. The Bunker is and was a special community of so many people working together.”

Devres let go of her role as Bunker’s designer in 2012. She says, “The silver lining was that by no longer doing design for anyone but myself, I was able to focus solely on my portrait and event photography. Eventually, I created new press photos for all the residents, many of which are still being used today.”

By January 2013 Common Name took over Bunker’s graphic work. The New York-based design company, comprised by Yoonjai Choi and Ken Meier, create all of the event flyers, images for podcasts, label artwork, and did a re-design of the website and logo. “It’s been super nice to see their system develop, and to have a look that is consistent across everything we do,” Kasenic says.

The Bust

Although Bunker felt right at home at subTonic they began outgrowing the space and most weeks it would become uncomfortably packed. Manhattan at the time, Kasenic adds, became an unwelcoming space for parties and subTonic was “one of the last decent places you could really party in Manhattan.”  

There was one fateful party at subTonic during February 2007 that changed everything and impacted the Bunker evolution. Matthew Dear was playing; NYPD shut the party and the basement space down as it became apparent it was operating illegally for about seven years. Bunker threw parties upstairs at Tonic for a few months until the entire venue was shut down for good.

CROWD AT MATTHEW DEAR, SUBTONIC, 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

The crew relocated to Lunar Lounge in Williamsburg. Kasenic and most of his friends lived in the area at the time “so it just felt like a really natural move (even though quite a few people told me I was crazy for moving to Brooklyn at the time.” Shortly thereafter the party moved to Galapagos “which was really just the perfect fit for the natural evolution of the party.” This era was also when Kasenic bought a soundsystem, and each week for about five months he and Plaslaiko would setup and teardown. It spurred a new timeline and growth of Bunker’s attention to impeccable sound.

By 2008 Galapagos sold and became Public Assembly, where Bunker continued to refine their parties. The decor got darker, the crowd got bigger, the parties went later, and began to engage dancers with two rooms of music.

Public Assembly Shuts Down

Public Assembly was an integral venue for the party. But after a six-year run the venue closed in May 2013. Kasenic approached Shawn Schwartz of Output to help transfer all future bookings to the Williamsburg club.

Still never leaving the underground entirely, that year Bunker threw some parties at Trans-Pecos and K&K Buffet, a Chinese restaurant in Ridgewood. To this day Bunker has a keen eye and understanding for space. Solid venues stay in rotation depending on what works best for their programming.

In the past few years most of their local parties have been frequently hosted at Good Room, Nowadays, Elsewhere, Bossa Nova Civic Club, and Trans-Pecos, to name a few. Output and Good Room and all the other venues opening in Williamsburg came years later, and I’m honestly not sure any of that would have happened without The Bunker proving techno could succeed in the neighborhood,” Kasenic says. The multi-faceted party is not limited to one space, as Kasenic chooses venues based on the needs of the party.  

Most clubs that are going to present the kind of music we do at The Bunker tend to bring me in to check out the space before they open and Good Room was no different. I immediately liked the layout of the space and the folks who were working there. Right around the time Output really started to feel like it was no longer the right fit for The Bunker, Good Room opened and I moved my bigger events over there. It’s been really great to watch the space evolve over the years and become much more organized. I don’t feel like we have a single space I’d call home base at the moment, it’s kind of a roaming party. I try to put each party in the space that feels best for it.”

The Sound

While the location shifts made things interesting, it kept the crew on their toes and into a state of fine-tuning. Although not everyone knows Bunker’s entire origin story, there is one characteristic of the party that is blatantly apparent: a dedication to high-quality sound. The process to get to their current state all started with the “Beyond” system.

We used my personal soundsystem that I bought when we left subTonic, because we moved to bigger venues that didn’t really have sound that was up to our standards,” Kasenic says. Chris McNaughty [McNaughton] became Bunker’s sound guru after they met in 2005. With a dbx DriveRack and an ear for speaker placement at Galapagos “he really helped tremendously.” During this time they stored the system at the space and set up each week. “It was a huge pain in the ass but I think it was worth it. In retrospect the system wasn’t much compared to what we play on these days, but it was probably the best system in town where interesting techno was being played every week,” Kasenic continues.

BUNKER 8 YEAR ANNIVERSARY, OPTIMO, 2011 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

The biggest difference between Bunker then versus now according to Cloutier? “I don’t have to load an entire SUV with Bryan’s sound system and set it up at 8 p.m. anymore,” he says with a laugh. “Seriously though…if I never have to build those stacks ever again I’d be thrilled. But to be completely honest, that was actually one of the things that really brought me, Derek and Bryan together every week – the sweaty work making something from nothing in the backroom of Public Assembly and feeling massively connected to the party from start to finish. I’m not as connected that deeply because I’m in Berlin and not at every event, but I’m still a part of the team, obviously, but its one thing to toil it out, then weekly and eventually monthly, as hard as we did compared to a bit more hands-off with Tsunami sound and ‘real’ clubs with their own staff. But definitely one thing that has never changed is Bryan’s unending love for the party, his residents, his staff, and the attention to detail that makes every person that comes through the door feel like they’re welcomed in to his home.”

Nik Grabowski (aka NikSound) helped engineer sound for Blood and Thunder III and every party following until 2015. Taking things to the next level, Kasenic says “Nik was a true professional and I still think about how amazing he made that back room of Public Assembly sound from then on out. He really set the tone and set us above and beyond our wildest expectations of what The Bunker could sound like.”

Lately the parties mostly take place in venues with established professional systems. Sometimes Bunker will bring in some extra sound. “We’re very lucky to have a group of venues we can use in Brooklyn now that all have great sound, so we rarely need to supplement or provide a system, but that was just a far off dream when we first got started,” he says.

The Collaborations

The tiny basement party has since grown not only in size at home in NYC, but has partnered with numerous high-caliber institutions and festivals.

A transcontinental connection in 2010 became a pivotal moment as Bunker started a collaborative effort with Berlin’s Berghain/Panorama Bar. Kasenic reached out to Ostgut with an idea for a quarterly showcase series. “I was just really enthusiastic about everything they were doing at the time (and I still am), so it just felt like a great fit and those parties were very successful. I think it started a bit of an exchange between The Bunker and Ostgut, which continues to this day and has always felt perfectly natural.” One of the highlights of his entire DJ career, he says, was being asked to play Panorama Bar alongside Plaslaiko and Cloutier in 2012.

The series itself took place at Public Assembly, with two rooms dedicated to reflect the two spaces of the legendary Berlin venue. Guests have included Germany’s beloved residents Marcel Dettmann, Steffi, Ben Klock, nd_baumecker, Surgeon, Marcel Fengler, Ryan Elliott, Tama Sumo, Tobias, and Prosumer.

 

berghain bunker

BERGHAIN x BUNKER (CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT) SURGEON, ND_BAUMECKER, TAMA SUMO, RYAN ELLIOTT, TOBIAS, PROSUMER, MARCEL FENGLER, BEN KLOCK, STEFFI [PHOTOS BY SEZE]

I think that both Ostgut and The Bunker appreciate a proper party in the right environment that puts the quality of music first, so the relationship has always worked,” Kasenic says.

Switching roles in February 2015 and 2016 Bunker residents made their way to Germany for a full label showcase for Klubnacht. Those bills included Kasenic, Voices From The Lake, Peter Van Hoesen, Plaslaiko, Cloutier, Marco Shuttle, Len Faki, Mark Verbos, Romans, Løt.te, Patrick Russell, Function, Clay Wilson, DJ Nobu and Efdemin.

“Those were just tremendous honors, really special nights that are impossible to put into words. I do remember having a conversation with Derek at the 2015 one where we were both just kind of like, ‘Holy shit can you believe The Bunker has come this far??? We NEVER would have believed this was possible when we started this thing!’” – BRYAN KASENIC

During 2010 Bunker’s reach stretched even further, as Kasenic started working with Unsound (a festival based in Kraków, Poland) to host a sister event in NYC. This experience, he says, was eye-opening. “Mat and Gosia from Unsound taught me a lot about working with cultural institutes to get grants to make things happen, which is something I’d barely thought about until then. It also kicked my production chops up a few levels as accommodating so many artists in town at once provide challenges on a level I’d never experienced before. I think doing those bigger Unsound events proved to me that I could do even bigger events on my own, and helped the party grow.”

And it truly did.

Bunker started to really spread on a global level. After falling in love with Montreal’s MUTEK Festival, Bunker hosted an annual Brooklyn preview party for three years in hopes of inspiring others to make their way up North. Those lineups included names like Claro Intelecto, Andy Stott, Pangaea, Efdemin, Vincent Lamieux, Cheap & Deep, Akufen, and Stephen Beaupre, to name a few. There were a few collaborations nights with Netherland-based Clone Records, also. Bunker itself was being showcased internationally at Air Tokyo as well as Stereo Montreal. Even back at home, Bunker teamed up with the critically acclaimed Unter to host a 36-hour party at Paperbox and the Market Hotel in March, July and September 2016.

Russell says, “The Bunker filled a significant gap in NY when the underground techno scene was somewhat in remission, so in a way Bryan helped keep a particular part of the scene alive and thriving during those times. In addition, he brought in global talent that the run-of-the-mill clubs weren’t quite hip to yet, and helped make them household names here in the US – artists like Donato Dozzy, Demdike Stare, and the Ostgut Ton crew, just to name a few.”

The list goes on, with events at the Compound in San Francisco, Communikey in Denver, a partnership with Osgut Ton, a 6-hour showcase at Sustain-Release, Concrete Paris, and also Inciting in Philadelphia. Not to mention Bunker had its first full label showcase during Denver’s Great American Techno Festival in 2014. That evening in October featured live sounds from Clay Wilson, Leisure Muffin, Løt.te, Zemi17, and DJ sets from Servito, Ulysses, and Kasenic.

Most notable, though, is the long standing relationship between Bunker and Interdimensional Transmissions. The energy and connection between these two crews is symbiotic. With many Bunker nights in the caverns of Detroit, or the Midwest bringing No Way Back to the East Coast.

ERIKA SHERMAN, 2011, BRENDAN GILLEN , 2010 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

Interdimensional Transmission’s Brendan Gillen says, “We really get along on a creative level, they recognize what we do that’s unique and we see that in them. We share much of the same taste, especially for heady jams and incredible Midwestern DJs.” When it comes to the compatibility between the two crews he says, “It’s effortless. We just happen to love so many of the same things, that it just makes sense to collaborate. And through the collaboration we’ve become good friends.”

The New Year Parties

Ringing in the New Year with Bunker became a staple for many. On one of the biggest party nights of the year (especially in NYC) their aim was to provide a party space for friends and family free from amateurs. Sattinger and Kasenic continued the tradition from the Polar Bear Club into the first year of Bunker with a very intimate party. 

Then on the first of January 2007 they hosted the first in a series of parties called “Blood and Thunder.”

BLOOD & THUNDER FLYERS [ARTWORK BY SEZE]

Derek Plaslaiko came up with the name. The idea seemed pretty ridiculous at the time: to do an 18 hour afterparty on New Year’s Day,” Kasenic says. It followed an all-night party he threw at 12-turn-13 with Wolf + Lamb. “Basically, Seth Troxler, Derek Plaslaiko and Taimur Agha played together for the entire 18 hours [of Blood and Thunder]. If memory serves they took a break at some point so Function could do a brief set, and that was shortly before he moved to Berlin and the whole Sandwell District thing kicked his DJ career into overdrive. This one really set the tone for the next few years to come and is one of my most memorable NYEs. I actually met my current girlfriend Catherine Eberhardt for the first time that night. It seems like we were all so young at that point and there weren’t a ton of crazy afterhours, especially public ones happening in NYC at the time so it really caught NYC by surprise in a way.”

The following year “another pretty legendary” Blood and Thunder took place at Galapagos, the former Public Assembly. By 2009 the third edition of the party expanded to both rooms of Public Assembly. The fourth and final Blood and Thunder took place in 2010. Kasenic says it was “a good time, but it felt like the party had really run its course and competition had become pretty heavy with lots of other late night afterhours things in Brooklyn, so we ended it with that. The Alex Smoke set was particularly amazing and was for sure the highlight of the night.”

BLOOD & THUNDER 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

But this did not keep Bunker from continuing the annual toast to auld lang syne. Newworldacquarium played for the first NYE edition of The Bunker Limited. “Mike Servito blew the roof off that night and I think it’s when I decided he HAD to become a resident DJ. He accepted that offer and the rest is history,” Kasenic recalls.

From 2013-2015 the New Year’s parties were held at Trans-Pecos with lineups limited to family and friends “and the crowd was always the best mix of our close friends and mega fans, so those were all amazing and the perfect way to spend a nice NYE away from the crowds.”

In a constant state of balance, as the party grows Kasenic understands and pushes to maintain a space where roots can be revisited. The early days. When Bunker was an intimate community.

The Bunker Limited

BUNKER LIMITED 2011 [ARTWORK BY SEZE]

As big as things were growing, the crew knew it was important to keep alive that tight-knit atmosphere that the party was born in. It was November 2010 when Kasenic used the 70 North 6th Street Loft to throw a party. Just above Public Assembly became home to the Bunker Limited. These loft parties – which would run from 10 p.m. until 6 a.m. – kept Kasenic in touch with the original vision of Bunker. Narrowed down to a maximum of 150 presale tickets, Bunker Limited allowed DJs to really take the dancer on a journey with an extended set in an intimate setting.

A lot of my closest friends and biggest fans (and myself) were missing the earlier, more intimate days of the party,” Kasenic says. “So the idea was born to charge a higher ticket price, just bring in one DJ for the entire night (something I had grown to love in my early days of NYC clubbing), and limit the number of ticket sales to keep it from getting too crowded inside.” No cameras and no guestlist.

The concept was a huge hit with my core audience and I continue those parties to this day whenever I have an appropriate venue for it,” he continues. “I think the energy and vibe of these parties really kept things interesting to my closest friends and biggest fans of the party and breathed some new life into it.”

The Podcasts

Since 2008 The Bunker Podcast has been churning out music, with a total of 169 episodes released. Each mix of the series can be found archived and available for download.

We started it at a time when very few techno podcasts existed (before SoundCloud made things a lot easier). It was originally made up of recordings made of sets at the parties,” Kasenic says. “Now the podcast is mostly recordings people make at home. It’s really just meant as a way for people around the world who can’t necessarily make it to the parties to hear the kind of music we present at The Bunker. With the growing label roster over the past few years, it’s become a really nice way to keep everyone from the family in the mix. We also often present podcasts now from artists not in the immediate family who will be performing soon at one of our events. As a whole, I think the podcast really does a great job of tracing the musical evolution of the party over the years.”

Additionally, in 2016 Bunker New York launched a “a trip through psychedelic electronics“ radio show on Red Bull Music Academy. Airing every first and third Thursday of the month past shows have hosted residents and artists that exude that Bunker energy. 

I always do somewhat extended interviews with the artists on the radio in addition to their DJ or live sets. I think this really gives our fanbase who don’t personally know all of these artists like I do to get a view into their personalities and learn more about them,” he continues. “I was a bit skeptical about starting a radio show, but found out I missed doing it (I started out doing many years of college radio), and really enjoy producing the show.”

The Record Label

Kasenic always wanted to start a record label but couldn’t find the right time until his motivation became serious in 2012. That year Bunker parties were being hosted frequently at Output which helped lighten the load enough to get the project going. In the hopes of forming a deeper connection than just throwing parties, the creation of the label helped Bunker’s concept grow in complexity. Two years later the label launched.

Throughout 2013 he was reaching out to artists (both established and unfamiliar) asking for productions. By year’s end he had four EPs ready to release. Now, there are 31 records, including one digital-only compilation for the 15 year anniversary of Bunker.

Conceptually, the record label really stretches beyond itself. Each release is like a snapshot of what The Bunker is while somehow simultaneously creating the evolution of its own identity with each new production. Pieces of wax and soundwaves become fragments of a whole, constantly morphing while somehow still maintaining a core essence. Even beyond the dancefloor, there is still a kinetic energy unfolding.  

Creating this label continued to teach Kasenic even more about the meaning of the creative process, how relationships with each artist vary, and how each connects to their creativity in a totally different way. The label has always served as an outlet for music from artists who feel inspired by what they’ve experienced at The Bunker parties,” he says.

The Agency

In addition to the parties, the label, and everything else Bunker entails, Kasenic also runs a North American agency – Beyond Bookings – along with Michelle Erfer. The growing list includes 28 resident DJs and label artists that Bunker represents. 

The Celebration – 15 Years In The Making

This year The Bunker celebrates 15 years of music, parties, and memories. To commemorate the anniversary the label released 15 Years Of The Bunker [BK-031]. The 26-track digital-only compilation was released in January this year featuring work from some usual suspects and more.

I really think the music speaks for itself on that one, I’m incredibly proud of how well that turned out and super grateful to my family of artists for doing such an amazing job,” Kasenic says.

Of course The Bunker will also be toasting the milestone with parties around the world. Coming up during Movement weekend in Detroit, Interdimensional Transmissions will host Bunker on Monday night at Tangent Gallery for the second edition of 313: Return To The Source – a three-day party series. “It’s our third Monday night party produced by Interdimensional Transmissions at Tangent, and it’s been great fun to evolve the concept of the party with Brendan and Erika each year,” Kasenic says.

This year the party will run from 10 p.m. – 6 a.m. on Monday, May 28. The Dance Room will present specially curated DJ pairings from Jane Fitz and Eric Cloutier, Function and Adam X, and Mike Servito with Bryan Kasenic. A new addition will take form as The Come Down Room where dancers are invited to take a breather and chill-out. Seating will be available for music that is “not quite beatless ambient music, but not really pushing the dance floor either, exploring the mind via incredibly strange music. We’ll be exploring the more downtempo and straight up demented side of The Bunker, the stuff that falls between the cracks of boring genre distinctions.” Sounds will be provided by Gunnar Haslam, Abby Echiverri, Clay Wilson and rrao, Beau Wanzer, and Stallone The Reducer.

Gillen says he is most excited for “all the collaborative sets, from the closing set of Jane Fitz & Eric Cloutier, to whatever happens for the Function & Adam X thing, we look forward to hearing those sounds, but also in the Come Down room hearing what Beau Wanzer & Stallone the Reducer have chosen to blow our minds.”

I.T.’s Erika Sherman adds, “We just saw Abby Echiverri deliver an amazing live set at the Gays Hate Techno campout, and really looking forward to hearing what she comes up with for this context.”

What is it about The Bunker that has inspired 15 years of creativity? For one: serious dedication and undying passion as the foundation.
Plaslaiko says, “I think a lot of it has to do with the underground aesthetic, even though the parties are all thrown in legal venues. The music is always stellar, and Bryan really doesn’t want to just get whoever is the hottest thing in dance music. He’s very careful about who he decides to bring out. Nearly all of the artists who play The Bunker are of the same mindset when it comes to this music, and they’re not trying to be superstars. And we all seem to make new friends when someone comes out. I know that’s more about our experience with the artists, but I think that same mentality gets transmitted to the people who attend the party. So, when you’ve kinda been doing things the way Bryan has for the last 15 years, the right people seem to notice.”
People have, people do, and will continue to notice. Join the celebration if you find yourself in Detroit this weekend. Pre-sale tickets are still available and can be purchased through Resident Advisor.

Sequencer asks: Did you ever expect Bunker to become what it is today?

“Well no, but I invited Bryan to take over because I knew he would do something with it. Mike and I just liked to play records. Occasionally I would make a flyer. We did book some great artists though.” – Chris Sattinger

“You know, I’m really not sure! I guess I’m not surprised that it’s still going strong, but I’m somewhat surprised (and proud) that it’s gotten to where it has. It’s been a long journey! And Bryan has done a fantastic job of keeping it up to code for the tenure of the party.” – Derek Plaslaiko

No.” – Ivy Feracco

I don’t think you think about the future when you are enjoying the moment. In hindsight, it’s not surprising. Bryan has an incredible work ethic. Has spent his life building up a community and surrounding himself with great people. And he loves what he does. Passion and dedication typically make big things. But no, If you had asked me then I couldn’t have guessed.” – Shel Kimen

Yes, Bryan always had a very clear vision to promote a specific group of artists through the radio show, booking agency, party, record label. It is exactly what I envisioned it would become. The only surprise is that I am no longer a part of it all. And I am ok with that.” – Seze Devres

“I don’t think I realized what I aligned myself with at the time. I knew it was special and I knew a connection was made early on with The Bunker New York. I think we are all in that kind of ‘surprise!’ moment by the growth and success it’s having after all these years! I also believe it was inevitable that The Bunker would evolve and make its mark. I think we all believed in the establishment and what it stands for. You don’t have this kind of longevity just by luck. Bryan Kasenic is brilliant and intelligent and has a vision that’s being realized. I think The Bunker New York is a very special work in progress with ideas and intentions that stay true to it’s sound and aesthetics. I think we are all looking forward to the future of it all.” – Mike Servito

Honestly, yes, totally. I’ve seen how Byran has slowly and steadily built the brand in a very calculated yet entirely genuine way, and those kind of honest maneuvers resonate with people worldwide easily. The whole aspect of The Bunker has been to tell our musical stories truthfully and without outside influence and I think Bryan, and every one of the residents and artists on the label, have done just that, and thusly its become a ‘thing.’” – Eric Cloutier

The first Bunker I attended was in 2006 at subTonic, and it’s been great to watch it grow larger and stronger over the last 12 years. With the addition of the label and now events all over the globe, I can’t wait to see where it goes next.” – Patrick Russell

Yes of course, the concepts are strong, open minded and they get the message out there. Also, the group of people they’ve cultivated in their home city that attend their events and make them so special… you would just expect the waves of this to resonate.” – Brendan Gillen

ANTHONY PARASOLE, MARCEL DETTMANN, SEZE DEVRES, 2009 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

DEREK PLASLAIKO, DANIEL BELL, BRYAN KASENIC, 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

MIKE SERVITO, 2010 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

DONATO DOZZY, 2010 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

BLOOD AND THUNDER, 2008 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

PATRICK RUSSELL, 2011 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

BUNKER 6 YEAR ANNIVERSARY, MARCEL DETTMANN, 2009 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

BUNKER CREW, 2011 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

TIMEBLIND, 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

303 PARTY, CARLOS SOUFFRONT, 2006 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

BRYAN KASENIC, 2009 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

WOLF & LAMB AT GALAPAGOS, 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

DEREK PLASLAIKO, 2010 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

BLOOD AND THUNDER 2007 [PHOTO BY SEZE]

Volvox

Ariana Paoletti’s transformative journey through sound has certainly brought her changes in scenery. From her formative gothic years to becoming the DJ known worldwide as Volvox, it has been her undying passion for music that continues to drive her. A Portuguese saying goes, “O amor é algo eterno; o aspecto pode mudar, mas não a essência” – Love is something eternal; the aspect may change, but not the essence.

She was born in São Paulo, Brazil. But when she was two years old her family moved to the United States due to the country’s 1987 debt crisis. “Just days before my family was set to move the banks shut down and kept everyone’s money, including my parent’s entire savings,” she says. “They arrived in the United States with a little more than $2,000 to their names, but my American grandparents took them in and helped them get started in Buffalo (where my mother was from).”

continental buffalo

THE CONTINENTAL, BUFFALO [PHOTO BY LORRAINE SIMON]

In Western New York on the Niagara River sits Buffalo, a small and gritty rust belt city only a stone’s throw from Canada. Not only was Buffalo’s rave scene strong in the early 2000s, the Queen City brought life to various famous underground artists and was also home to a very prominent hardcore scene (most notably Everytime I Die). “I had a great time growing up there and was never bored,” Ariana says. She attended Amherst Central High School, just east of downtown proper. She was a vocalist in a punk band, and from 2001-03 she played keys and performed vocals in EBM-industrial band Process of Elimination; they would open for international Industrial acts locally and in Rochester, N.Y. 

“There was a venue called the Showplace Theater that was in a crummy part of town that would let us host our own shows but we had to buy tickets from the venue and resell the tickets ourselves to cover the overhead of the event. So imagine a bunch of goths pushing tickets on their friends, almost monthly. It was a hassle but we loved it! Many times we just paid for the tickets ourselves and let our friends come for free. We were all under 18 at the time so these shows were the best option we had for going out and having a scene,” she says.

the continental buffalo

THE CONTINENTAL, BUFFALO

A pivotal place that defined her teenage clubbing days was The Continental, a now defunct goth/punk dive bar that was located downtown at 212 Franklin Street. “It had been open since the ‘80s and was the de-facto home of the underground/alternative scene in the area. It had a performance stage on the first floor and a dance club upstairs. It was dark and dirty and smelly and sticky and beloved,” she says. “The funniest thing I remember about the club at The Continental was that the dance floor was the width of the building but relatively narrow, the long side was mirrored and so everyone in their goth finery would dance and preen facing the mirrors, checking themselves out and the others behind them! Eventually my band played there once or twice, which was pretty exciting for me as a teen.”

It was a space unlike any other in Buffalo, where fetishism could be expressed freely and the dark electronic music ranged from postpunk, Industrial, and EBM. “Occasionally they would host touring band shows that were 16+ and I would hide in the bathroom to avoid being kicked out before the 18+ club night started afterwards. I specifically remember an Ohgr (Nivek Ogre of Skinny Puppy solo act) show in 2001 that was a big moment for me. Ogre was the most famous Industrial music figure after Trent Reznor of NIN and Al Jourgensen of Ministry so this show coming to Buffalo was a huge deal.”

When it comes to raving Buffalo is primed for it. Similar to Detroit, the city relied on manufacturing (particularly with Bethlehem Steel) and saw a rapid socio-economic decline along with deindustrialization. Homes began to disintegrate and many spots in the city became ghost-like structures, only to be inhabited by temporary new life.

groove attack

ARIANA AT GROOVE ATTACK 2.0 – NIAGARA FALLS, 2000 [PHOTO COURTESY OF ARIANA PAOLETTI]

“Just before I went totally goth I started attending raves in the area with some friends – Buffalo had tons of abandoned spaces along Main Street downtown and also in Fort Erie and Niagara Falls. The first rave I ever went to was in 2000, put on by local promoters Phlux and it was a MASSIVE affair held at the Niagara Falls Convention Center. My parents drove me there and picked me up at noon the next day. I had never been to any dance event on that scale and I still distinctly remember walking into the massive main room, it was so dark and large you couldn’t see the ceiling, or the end of the room. It was a proper classic rave with multiple rooms each a different genre including a chillout room. For a while my parents drove me to and picked me up from these events to ensure I was behaving responsibly. Indeed at this time I was still naive to the world of drugs; I was just thrilled to be able to dance for eight hours straight! There were many raves I attended around that time but Groove Attack was by far the largest and most memorable.”

niagara falls rave

GROOVE ATTACK 2.0 FLIER – NIAGARA FALLS, 2000

When school wasn’t in session Ariana would perform The Rocky Horror Picture Show each Friday night at the Amherst Theater on Main Street, a staple to this day for new art films and re-screening classics. “Nearly our entire cast was from my high school. I had very horrible acne on my face and back at the time that I was extremely embarrassed about it but performing in various states of undress with these folks helped me feel more confident about my body and how I looked! My mom would drop me off at midnight and watch X-Files at home until 2 a.m., she’d then pick me up when our show was over. Once I had my drivers permit I drove myself and my friends home from these shows as my parents were very sick of staying up so late,” she says. “I had stellar grades and was very serious about school which is why my parents were always so accepting of my nighttime interests!”

Upon graduating in 2003 she was deciding between Boston or Chicago; she chose to attend Massachusetts College of Art and to continue clubbing unhindered. “I was already well entrenched in the Goth clubbing scene by the time I turned 18 and indeed I chose to move to Boston over Chicago because the minimum age for clubs in Illinois is 21 whereas in Boston it was 19+ at the time. Club life had already become my main interest and there was no way I was going to put that on hold for three years!”

A DANCER IN 1996 AT MANRAY

Through Livejournal she ended up connecting with Angeldustrial, a local crew throwing events at Cambridge goth-club, Manray. “They welcomed me with open arms into their midst. I became a part of the crew, eventually joining their fetish-leaning dance performance troupe” for about a year after her move. “That was the beginning of my professional involvement with clubs, as I made the transition from spectator to performer.”

manray massachusetts

MANRAY CLUB, MASSACHUSETTS

Angeldustrial’s core beliefs include “raising cultural discourse through high technology and blending social circles for greater DIY networking.” These friends got Ariana to start DJing in 2006 with a group birthday gift organized by her friend Jenn – a Numark CD Mix 2. Koren (aka DJ Punketta) helped get her first DJ gig at Redline, a Harvard Square bar that’s now closed. But before she started learning the craft she was being molded on many Manray nights in the dark corners of the club.

Manray was an integral space for the Industrial/goth scene from 1985 to 2005; its name derived from the Dadist artist. Although it has been more than a decade since closing, Ariana can still visualize the space vividly. It was “a sprawling old-school style club with several rooms, a main dance floor, second dance floor, lounge with its own bar and a downstairs with men and womens restrooms, coat check and a large dressing room. Manray’s main dance floor had a second story DJ booth so the DJ was totally out of sight, but looming over the dance floor. There was a phone booth in the corner you used to request songs from resident DJ Chris Ewen. There was a large stage that hosted many famous bands and also the dance/fetish performances. The main room was sonically dedicated to goth, rock, and ‘80s synth. Swishy stuff that trad(itional)-goths loved to swoop around to in a flourish of velvet, point toe boots and clove smoke. The second room was more of my domain, focused on EBM, industrial and alternative electronic sounds with a decidedly more cyber-futuristic and European slant.”

As Manray closed its doors in 2005 the local scene fell along with it, although some of the club’s events continue elsewhere to this day.

Eventually she “made the transition from goth/industrial to electro/techno.” A party called Hearthrob – which took place every other Tuesday night at The Middlesex Lounge – is where she sparked a residency with Make It New. Hearthrob is also where she met “an entire small village of people that now live in NYC all met there, including NYC lighting designers Michael Potvin and Kip Davis, Unter’s Olga Romanova and KUNQ’s False Witness.”

“I ditched the black and went full on new-rave as the noughties rolled on into the blog-house era. Soon after I was asked to become a resident of Make It New, the weekly Thursday party at The Middlesex thrown by the Basstown crew. The people I met there showed me that you didn’t have to be ‘an adult’ or established to throw a great party, and the Boston electronic scene as it was now basically grew up around the Hearthrob and Basstown parties.”

ARIANA 2007 AT HEARTHROB [PHOTO COURTESY OF NICKYDIGITAL]

By 2008, freshly graduated with an art degree in hand, she decided to attempt living in Berlin. “By then I knew Techno was my life and so I had to get to the motherland. I remember the first time I went to Berghain was in 2008, as I heard it was a pretty sweet fetish/alternative club, like I was used to at Manray. I was still mourning it’s closing so I was excited to get back in black,” she says. “It was so way beyond anything I imagined. I remember I wanted to see Mark Broom play so I rushed my friends to get there at 1 a.m., which to me was very late to get to the club! When I arrived I found out Mark wasn’t playing until 6 a.m. or so…what the fuck!? I had no idea clubs were open that late.. On some later trip someone from Juilliard took my photo outside the club for a school project, maybe one of the earliest such surveys.. I don’t know where those images ended up but I’ve always wondered…”

Her best friend Lauren was working as label manager for International Deejay Gigolo Records, and DJ Hell would invite Ariana to staff meetings. Exploring her local Media Play in Buffalo is where she became familiar with the label and others such as Astralwerks and Hed Candi.

“CD compilations used to be a huge thing and the Gigolo series was second to none. This is where I learned about artists from Terence Fixmer to Derrick Carter. When I was 17 years old I told myself ‘one day I’ll go to Berlin and meet DJ Hell.’ It was an insane dream, as far removed from my teen life as anything I could imagine. Well, I completely forgot about that until in 2008 I was sitting in the Gigolo Berlin office and it hit me. ‘Holy shit.’ I thought to myself. ‘I’m here. ANYTHING is possible!’” – VOLVOX

Three months later in Berlin, she says, “I was 23, recently graduated and jobless, with blue hair, a terrible spat of chin acne and a bogus story of working at a record label. Nobody would rent me a room until one day I met a Brazilian guy whose room I was interviewing for. The lady I was looking to rent from had a giant gnarled ponytail hanging off the side of her head and red lipstick that was all out of the lines. She had a huge dog, hundreds of plants and asked me metaphysical questions about ‘what I wanted from Berlin.’ ‘You don’t want to live here,’ he told me. ‘This lady is crazy. If you don’t find anything else you can come stay with me, I’m moving into a one-bed.’ And that is just one of the many times being Brazilian has saved me in a pinch.” Their chemistry as roommates matched as his job had him up early to work each morning and Ariana would sleep during the day after being out each night.

Until one morning her roommate woke her up in a panic – there was a fire.

“We tried to make an escape but we were overwhelmed by smoke in the hallway and I almost lost consciousness choking in the darkness. It didn’t help I just HAD to bring my DJ bag with me. I started to drift off then I remember thinking to myself ‘No, I’m not going out like this, not now.’ I got up and shouted for my roommate. Just as we were both about to pass out he smashed the hallway window with his bare firsts. Firefighters arrived soon after and took us to the hospital. After this experience I decided I had enough of Berlin and moved back to Boston.”

volvox basstown visions

VOLVOX BASSTOWN VISIONS 2010 [PHOTO COURTESY OF NICKDAWG2000]

She spent three more years in Boston DJing, throwing events and dealing vintage clothes. Her gigs were frequent, but $100 a night just wasn’t enough. “In the back of my mind there was always this nagging voice telling me that a wider world was waiting for me, and that I was squandering my potential staying in Boston.” In 2011 she made her move to New York City.

Working her way into the rhythm of the city she started promoting at The Flat, and also helped found Moon II along with Michael Potvin. This warehouse art space on Rutledge Street off Broadway became home to a series of raves and events which Ariana says “put our group on the map in the burgeoning DIY electronic scene.” One of the space’s first tenants, Daniel Fisher (aka DJ Physical Therapy), was a nexus figure integrating them into the local scene. Ariana recalls Ron Morelli playing one of the first parties and Mykki Blanco using the space to rehearse.

jack dept. nyc

JACK DEPT. NYC

“Eventually the local Hasidim who owned the space brought those efforts to a close, they certainly didn’t appreciate all the queer party freaks that were hanging outside, smoking cigarettes and carrying on into the morning light,” she says.

Fischer introduced her to John Barclay, owner of Bushwick’s beloved Bossa Nova Civic Club. At the time the bar had just opened and he was looking for a resident on first Fridays of each month. She and John Barera ran the monthly together for a couple years before it evolved into what is now known as Jack Dept. “For the first couple years the party had no name, only hot DJ lineups and little more than a Facebook event. That was the style in Brooklyn at the time, very understated, if you knew the artists you knew what was up. I don’t even have flyers from that time, I guess we never even made any!” Yet, popularity for the party grew.

“When I came up with the name Jack Dept. all the energy we had put into the parties up until then just came together in a big way. I remember one dancer excitedly letting me know ‘I’ve been to ALL the Jack Dept.’s!’ …it was only our second party. That’s when I knew the name was spot on, that it would encourage such enthusiasm and also stand for a consistent level of forward-thinking bookings.”

Some of the party’s bookings include Shawn Rudiman, Kiernan Laveaux and Father of Two, Justin Cudmore, Doc Sleep, Hot Mass residents, Eris Drew, Mary Yuzovskaya, Patrick Russell – and that’s just to name a few. “Over the years I’d say half the people that came to the early parties have become famous in their own right and the party is now informing a new generation of edgy Brooklyn clubgoers,” she says, adding that her and Barera are working to bring in national upcoming talent.

mosaique volvox

PULSE @ MOSAIQUE – RUSSIA, 2017

“I deeply appreciate having the privilege to break young artists here in NYC and also to provide an intimate club experience for more established DJs to enjoy. As I play more and more massive events across Europe I have recognized that the intimate dive/club experience is something that brings me back to my roots and lies at the heart of my passion for dancing and electronic music.”

Out of the party grew a digital-only record label of the same name in 2016. Pushing lesser known producers who create techno and acid, the imprint has seen releases from Will Martin, M//R, TX Connect, AAAA, Horos, Innershades & Robert D, and Pete Vai. Ariana handles the art direction.  

Additionally, the Bossa Nova residency is where she became acquainted with Frankie Decaiza Hutchinson, Emma Burgess-Olson and Christine McCharen-Tran: the founders of Discwoman. This collective has grown to become a globally-recognized platform and booking agency for woman-identifying artists. As one of the group’s first clients, Discwoman has played an integral role for Ariana not only providing further growth for her DJ career, but in the strengthening of her community.  

Discwoman definitely turned me on to the female DJ mission. I guess what I’ve realized now is how amazing and special my youth experiences were in that all the scenes I’ve described until now were well-balanced between men and women, straights, gays and everyone in between, people of all races and decidedly liberal and creative leanings. I never felt like anything was missing but clearly that hasn’t been the story everywhere. I’m happy that Discwoman can inspire more people to take up electronic music, their support also showed me that there was a wider audience for what I do than I ever imagined!” – VOLVOX

When she’s not at Bossa she also holds a residency with Unter, the acclaimed underground party whose unique aesthetic and high-caliber bookings have brought on a serious reputation. Additionally, for the past few years she has been touring on an international level stretching to 21 countries beyond the United States. Her gig roster is incredibly extensive in review. But you can certainly find her frequenting Berghain/Panorama Bar. Perhaps you caught her performance alongside Umfang at last year’s Dekmantel. Back on Buffalo turf in 2016 she played to an intimate dancefloor for Strange Allure as the city’s underground scene began its most recent surge. That’s hardly close to scratching the surface of how much she has done and where she’s gone.

But, there was one party specifically that focused and refined even further the vision of love that Ariana has for music. In February 2016 she made her way back to Brazil for Dûsk, a party in celebration of Vênus Ácida [Acid Venus]; a party inspired by the planet poetically known for its myths of feminine energy and creating balance. Visiting the motherland reintroduced her to ancestral power. This reconnection to the idea of home helped her understand more so her own essence of being.

BRAZIL VOLVOX

DÛSK – BRAZIL, 2016

“I always say that my love of dancing comes from being born in Brazil. They just LIVE for it there! I’d say it’s the national pastime. It’s in my body and my soul. But growing up away from there I never knew what it was about me that was Brazilian. Since I knew only my family I had little sense of what Brazilian people were like. I only knew that I always felt somewhat different/alien all while growing up. That I had a fire inside me that wasn’t like others around me,” she says. “Finally in the last three years I’ve been able to spend quality time there as an adult, and so much has clicked into place. My passions, my desires, they all make more sense when I see myself in this frame. I am so so grateful for the friendships I’ve sparked there, the fruits of which have been deeply spiritually nourishing. I always come back from São Paulo feeling 100% more confident and embodied.”

Over time, life’s little details changed. No matter the city or sky she is under. No matter the time of the day. To thousands of people or just a handful. Ariana’s love for music is eternal.

I love music because it’s an internal journey that can take you around the world. Music has nourished me for my entire life and has been the great driving force of my happiness. As you can see my life has been wrapped around music for as long as I’ve been doing things and I’m just dumbfounded by how far it has all gone. I’m a lifer for sure, come find me in 10-20 years…I’ll be on the dancefloor.”

Patrick Russell

He is particular, precise, and plays with the concept of boundaries. These qualities are the driving force for Patrick Russell as both a selector and a DJ within the underground.

Russell grew up in a rural area outside of Detroit proper. During his early years he became enraptured by sound. In the country he experienced a spectrum of natural soundscapes on a silent background. In the industrial prairie of Detroit, city sounds and acid lines crack through the quietude.

It was here that he started to find initial inspiration in the ambient beauty of nature. “Growing up in a rural area impacted my musical tastes in a few ways. When your sonic existence is mostly silent, especially throughout formative years, I think you greatly appreciate the detail of distant thunder, wind rustling the leaves, even the slight buzzing of power lines when you’re out walking in the field,” he says. “Add to this the visual context of wide open spaces and just nature in general – be it endless trees, approaching storm clouds, or meteors in the nighttime sky – it not only creates a sense of mental space but also allows creative thoughts to move freely. I think this is why I have always been drawn to ambient and psychedelic music, since it matches these surroundings so well.”

Eventually, he was introduced to DJing through his teenage friend Phil, who would visit his sister in 1992 to go to N.A.S.A. raves in New York City. With this exposure and the evolution of his youthful soundscapes, he reached new sonic ground. He began studying the DJs he danced to. Initially he would watch and learn during sets from Mike Huckaby and D-Wynn at a club called Industry in Pontiac, Michigan. Soon Daniel Bell became a guiding inspiration, while Richie Hawtin dropped Russell deeper into a world of strange sounds and acid.

“I’ve always been enamored with music and sound, even as a small child. By age seven I had a tape recorder and headphones, and before that I’d sit in fascination listening to records or playing with the radio dial. This foundation isn’t necessarily unique to me, I realize…but the fact musical experiences can be that personal is, ironically, one of the reasons I’ve always wanted to share it. When I’m moved by music, it’s incredibly powerful and I have a strong desire to pay that experience forward. That transfer of energy and shared consciousness continues to be my sole motivation, even after all these years.” – PATRICK RUSSELL

Meanwhile, he has been crafting his art as a DJ since the early ‘90s. His method: creating a long format, hypnotic music narrative. He makes his choices carefully and in a definitive manner; he plays to bring the consciousness of a listener in and out until, ultimately, in an altered state. By doing so he is able to provide space for others to explore outside of their comfortable boundaries on the floor.

This technique and taste is what brought him deeper into, and eventually a resident of, Detroit’s Interdimensional Transmissions. He says he has been a fan of Ectomorph since their first record on the label. Subsonic Vibrations was a 1995 release of four electro tracks and three loops. Russell says, “To me those tracks were hugely influential, and they carved out a special niche at the time due to the stripped down, minimal freakout factor that operated outside the usual Detroit electro template.” As Detroit worked its way out of a scene slump during the early 2000s – pumping electro, techno and acid brought life back into the city. This motivation is what actually inspired the beginning of No Way Back.

Not only is Russell driven by the permeating beauty of the 303 sound, he (among so many Midwest ravers) live with an understanding that acid stretches beyond. “This is something many of us in the No Way Back crew have said for years, that acid is not limited to a 303; it’s broader than that instrument, but it’s also undefinable to a certain degree. I mean, you can’t always put your finger on what makes it ‘that’ sound, but there is something specific that clicks when you hear it. That intangible element immediately transports you to a different place where genre, and to a different degree, time, cease to apply. You can feel it on a dance floor and just react, almost involuntarily.”

Beyond the imprint, IT is a collective of like-minded folks on a similar sonic mission. Co-conspirators Erika Sherman and Brendan Gillen work along with Derek Plaslaiko, Michael Servito, Carlos Souffront, and others to present both parties and productions.

“I got to know BMG and Erika more personally through Carlos Souffront and the Crush Collision radio show in Ann Arbor, where I would drop by and play from time to time,” Russell says. “Eventually I started frequenting BMG’s place to have in-depth discussions on old Chicago house culture, Italo, disco, and like. I think he saw something in how studied I was in certain areas like this, and as a result started having me play IT parties from the early 2000s onward. Since then, I’ve considered them my home base…my musical family.”

LABYRINTH 2014

Around 10 years ago Plaslaiko became a resident of The Bunker while Russell was throwing parties in Detroit with Adriel Thornton (FreshCorp). “I’ve known Derek for over 20 years, and we’ve always been supportive of each other’s careers,” he says. “We were keen on bringing The Bunker crew for an all-day DEMF party. This is when I first met Bryan Kasenic, and in the years that followed we got to know each other better through my trips to New York and when he began partnering with No Way Back.” Russell first appeared at a Bunker party in February 2010 for the inaugural Unsound festival. “The response I received in Brooklyn that night was greater than I could have ever imagined, and along with meeting some truly incredible people it was my impetus for moving later that year. After years of regularly playing The Bunker as a guest, Bryan offered me a residency. It’s been a great ride so far.”

As a DJ he has become acclaimed worldwide. He pulls from his realms of sound and clearly follows a “no filler” mantra. This makes him not only a high-caliber selector but one that is able to succinctly navigate the listener through space and time. With a breadth of knowledge he is a versatile DJ and if you have experienced a set from Russell it is beyond clear he is a digger with a streamlined record collection. Maybe you have seen him crank a slamming set to a packed ballroom at No Way Back, or weave intricate soundscapes during his ambient set at Labyrinth in Japan. By harnessing this storytelling and mapping ability it has made him capable to play extended sets, such as the 10-hour stint at The Bunker/Unter 36-hour party.

As a producer he has had a few releases. In 2008 Valt Trax, a collaborative EP with Seth Troxler, was released through Circus Company. Additionally, through The Bunker he put out a 3-track EP with remixes of Clay Wilson, Romans, and Zemi.

On the horizon Russell has some productions in the works. “I have a few things to announce that I’m quite excited about.” A collaboration with Jasen Loveland is recently finished and he says hopes to be out later this year. “In addition, I have a remix of Mr. Loveland out this week on vinyl via LA’s Acid Camp,” he continues. “Also coming soon is a more experimental/dub remix of Certain Creatures on the new Mysteries Of The Deep label, which incidentally also launched this week. Lastly, a remix is also forthcoming in late spring for a major UK artist, which I’m particularly stoked about.”

If you’re in the North East this weekend Patrick Russell makes his Buffalo weekend debut for the next installation of REDUX this Saturday, January 13. Not to mention he will be playing a special ambient set the following night.

Justin Cudmore

In Central Illinois, Justin Cudmore was raised with Midwest sensibilities. His environment, he says, was simple but there were structural bounds that kept him from feeling truly free. When he was in his youth and started to feel he didn’t fit in with the the people around him, he found sanctuary just next door.

“There are straightforward expectations about what you’re supposed to do when you grow up, how you’re supposed to act, what you’re supposed to look like,” he says about his hometown of Springfield. “My family and my surroundings taught me to be genuine, polite, helpful…but anything different or out of character was pushed away. My family was not religious but still clung to conservative ideals on family and politics.”

Around middle school Cudmore started feeling estranged from his youthful peers. “I never opened up to my parents about these feelings, instead kept them inside. My neighbor growing up next door was an old hippie and I think she could tell I was different. She would invite me over for tea and we’d listen to The Beatles, go rummage through junk, make sculptures. That was an outlet for me I didn’t have in other places. She really opened up the world and my mind to let me think maybe it’s OK to be different; maybe there is more out there.”

Her name is Janis and one specific memory he has of her was when he was around 13 years old. “She invited me over and we were going through all the ‘junk’ she collected in her garage. She loved garage sales. We’d go out hunting for items on the weekend. On that day she showed me this collection of all blue glass bottles she had been keeping. Anytime she went to a rummage sale or antique mall there were certain items she looked for and loved to collect. These blue bottles were one of them,” he says. “She brought them out and we used metal pipes stuck into the ground to display them, almost as a bouquet. I vividly remember creating this decoration from nothing with her. It’s still there in her yard as you drive in. I loved these moments of creativity. I don’t think I realized at the time how comfortable I felt around her or how much I could be myself but looking back it was really special. Having that time helped me find myself at crucial points in my teen years. Janis really shaped me. She always encouraged travel, the arts, exploration, fun. Major contrast to my more conservative parents. I don’t think I’d be where I am without her guidance and love.”

CANOPY CLUB

PHYSICAL CHALLENGE AT CANOPY CLUB 2009

Music eventually became a grounding creative expressive outlet as he processed these feelings. He found his rhythm playing drums in grade school and continued until the end of college. “Percussion is something that always came easy to me. Jazz, concert, marching – I did all of it. Band was a place for weird kids to feel at home and have something to concentrate on,” he says. While attending the University of Illinois he played in some jam bands. Inspired heavily by dance-driven beats he would incorporate post-punk sounds when they played. “New wave groups really captured my ear,” he says. “The melodies were uplifting and the bass/drums driving still. That combination stuck with me.”

Cudmore started DJing in college and went on to host a club night called Physical Challenge. “I played a house party sophomore year for Halloween that was a big success. It was probably a mixture of blog remixes, ‘90s house classics, some of my own music, Girl Talk edits. Anyway, it went really well. The owner of the local club hit me up and asked if I’d like to help run this weekly night at The Canopy Club – one of the oldest spots for live music in Champaign-Urbana.” He agreed but only after returning from a six-month study abroad stint in Norway’s capital, Oslo. This trip became pivotal in expanding and fine-tuning Cudmore’s music taste.

“Living in Oslo those six months was a big shift for me. Dance music was just getting cemented as something I really cared for, I was started to dig, buy records – then I left to go live in a place where I could club at 19. I would go almost every weekend to different parties. Blå was my favorite. Locals like Todd Terje, Prins Tohams, G-Ha, this party called Sunkissed – really left an imprint on me,” he says. “Cosmic house but with a groove and a bassline. I returned from Oslo that summer with a whole new perception of dance music. It became clear to me just how little I knew and how much there is to know. It humbled me. I tried to bring that attitude to the club in Champaign every Wednesday, trying different combinations of things – disco, house, techno. I learned you didn’t have to stick to one sound.”

STUDYING ABROAD IN OSLO – PHOTO COURTESY OF CUDMORE

After college he moved to Chicago where he immediately delved into the scene, frequenting spaces like Smartbar, Danny’s, Berlin Nightclub, and warehouse parties such as No Affiliation. Somewhere in the mix he met Steve Mizek, founder and A&R head of Chicago labels Argot and Tasteful Nudes, as well as founder of now defunct website Little White Earbuds. The two started talking and Cudmore started working with Mizek on the website. He says, “I would assist with site architecture, coding, ads – we were trying to make some money off LWE. This is actually when I started first meeting a lot of New Yorkers over email like Bryan Kasenic. He would purchase ads for The Bunker in NYC. My big contributions were two Curator’s Cuts mixes, along with some end of year lists. LWE opened up a whole new world of underground music for me. It was kind of like going to Oslo all over again but even bigger and I felt more connected this time. My record collection at home was starting to grow and I felt confident to contribute a mix that I’d be proud of and one that would suit the style of LWE. To this day that final mix remains one of my favorites.”

At 21 years old and new to the clubbing, Chicago’s Smartbar became influential as he explored his sexual freedom. “Smartbar is dark, it’s seductive, no one seems to care what you do. It’s how clubs should be. That was the first basement club I went to. And really I did all my formative clubbing there. Nothing in Oslo really matched that layout,” he says. “At that time in Chicago, Queen hadn’t started yet. Sunday’s there was this party called Dollar Disco. But Boystown was close and sometimes gays would wander over. It was the first place I felt comfortable dancing with a boy all night to house music. It is a special place. Nowhere else could I have done that. That’s why places like this are so important. They allow us to be ourselves in the dark, in the fog. We can act on our curiosities and let the music take us over.”

From a childhood feeling different and out of place, he felt comfortable enough with himself around 22 years old to come out to his parents, “And it didn’t go well,” he says.

“That started a slow descent in my relationship with my family which wasn’t always the best to begin with. And so when Jordan, this boy I loved and cared for, said he got a job in New York and was moving – I didn’t know what to do but follow him. Also after two years of Chicago I felt like I was ready for more. As eye-opening as Chicago was for me, it does have a level of stagnation that I felt. I could have stayed in Chicago and really buried into my music production. I could have seen myself become a sort of Smartbar hermit – run with the same circles and be a bit of a techno recluse.”

He continues, “I moved to New York only for Jordan, my boyfriend; I didn’t want to lose him. Work/music was an added benefit of moving here. I really had no intentions of a music career coming here. I got a job at a startup, Jordan started his job, and we continued our lives pretty much as is in Brooklyn. I would come home from work every night, get stoned, work on music, dig for music. But not to play – not to release things – music at that point was always a side hobby. Sometimes I think I wouldn’t have been able to do what I’m doing now without all those years of simply going out, hibernating on music, learning things. Too many people jump right to the DJ thing. That was never a motivation of mine. I was curious, just like way back when I was young, hanging with my neighbor learning new things. It was always like peeling back a page on something new – new sounds, new labels. There was always something more to know.  In my eyes, it was not my time to be playing in New York. There are plenty of people who have put in their time and know loads more – they should be playing.”

justin cudmore

JUSTIN & MIKE IN DETROIT 2014 – PHOTO COURTESY OF CUDMORE

He began networking and connecting to people in the New York City realm, including folks at The Bunker like Bryan Kasenic and Mike Servito. Cudmore met Servito after making a comment on his Boiler Room set. A conversation started and a friendship blossomed.

“I went to see him play at TBA Brooklyn. That’s where I met him for the first time. There was some natural friendship chemistry between us and we stayed in touch. I went to see him play at the Bunker and Out Hotel. And soon hanging every few weeks turned to texting, meeting up after work for a margarita, getting dinner. Our relationship started and remains to be just because we get each other,” he says.

“We had similar problems with our family growing up about being gay. We were both searching for this kind of escape. Our friendship grew stronger because we could talk/share music but Mike was more like an older brother to me. He has shown me a lot, and how to be an adult.” With similar taste in music they would have lengthy email chains of tracks sent back and forth. Cudmore eventually introduced Servito to his boyfriend Jordan and Chris Miller (aka Gunnar Haslam). Miller, Servito and Cudmore eventually went on to start performing together as Hot Mix. He says, “Just three boys sharing stories, laughing about music – we had each other’s backs. I started regularly attending The Bunker probably six months into my friendship with Mike. I eventually met Bryan and the extended Bunker family. He probably wondered who was this kid Mike kept putting on the list.” Cudmore’s introduction to the Bunker were post-Public Assembly days, when parties were being held at Output. 

“The Bunker family is made up almost entirely of Midwest expats with a love for Detroit techno. They all sort of welcomed me in. Just as I have seen a handful of new faces welcomed in after me. Having never had a family that supported me for me growing up, here in NYC I had that for the first time, and I could be myself. Everyone had my back and I could be myself. I partied and met people and learned about more and more music along the way.” – JUSTIN CUDMORE

While living in New York City he continues to work on music, perform and push forward with the “Bushwick hustle” by picking up any occasional part-time job to make money on the side. New York, he says, “is an expensive city for an artist. But also all these friendships and opportunities would not have happened if I wasn’t here. I also wasn’t searching them out. I was just following my interests.”

Cudmore was fiddling around with production, sending little demos to Servito for constructive criticism with no real guided intention toward a certain label. “Sometimes he’d give some feedback, other times he’d say what he liked. But I wasn’t trying to make things for him or any label in particular so I just followed my own ear. One time I was playing with this acid line and sample and jammed this track together.” He sent the demo over to Servito. “Unlike other times, he reacted immediately and freaked out. He insisted to have the WAV so he could play it that weekend at Bunker. That was actually the first time Mike used a CDJ – before that he was always vinyl only. The track went over well.”

A huge opportunity came to fruition for Cudmore after Servito dropped that track during a Honey Soundsystem party in Folsom, Calif. Soon thereafter the label members made their way to NYC to chat with him about “Crystal”. A completely inspired Servito and Cudmore started working on a remix together. “We had never thought about working on music together before but it seemed natural – so we sat down and me as his engineer sort of built what he had in mind. The inclusion of Chris was a no brainer,” Cudmore says. “He was our boy and our DJ partner. He was of course extremely happy to contribute a remix. The whole package came together really naturally and nothing about it was forced. I think that’s why it was the success it was. It made sense on that label and came out right before the summer. Timing was on our side.”

AT THE ‘CRYSTAL’ 12″ RELEASE PARTY AT HALCYON NYC 2016 – PHOTO COURTESY OF CUDMORE

Since the track’s official release on HNYTRX in 2016, he has had subsequent releases on The Bunker as well as Interdimensional Transmissions for the Acid Series project. Performing throughout numerous venues in New York City, he has also been booked at TV Lounge and Tangent Gallery in Detroit, Hot Mass in Pittsburgh, and Spybar in Chicago. Abroad he has played at Berlin’s ://about blank, as well as in Barcelona and Ireland. He says he can feel that he’s on the scene’s radar, but at heart he will always cherish being an anonymous rave soul among a crowd of so many others still seeking the comfort he has always been on a mission to find.

“It’s cool but I feel this constant need to prove myself over and over every weekend. Mike says this won’t stop and he still does it to this day. But there is something about just being that kid in the background of the party dancing in the fog that I miss,” he says. “Now I’d be crazy to sit here and say I wish I still had a full time job and didn’t get to do music full time. I feel very fortunate to be where I am and not have to get another job after I was let go last fall. In a way I guess this was my dream and I didn’t know it yet. I feel like life kind of unfolded this path for me and all I was doing was following my interests and staying close to my friends.

“Every weekend I play I learn some things and also realize how much more there is to learn. It can be intimidating to be affiliated with such giants like Mike, The Bunker, Derek [Plaslaiko], IT Detroit. I always think that if I was some kid on the outside I’d be like, ‘Who is this kid anyway?’ I’ve always had some confidence issues and it’s taken people like my neighbor or people like Mike to pull me out of my shell. Mike is truly my mentor and best friend. He shaped me into who I am today. Maybe he saw something in me way back when we first met and groomed me for this. I just hope that everything continues to be fun and I can still have those moments lost on the dancefloor.”

Attendees of Sustain – Release will be able to catch Cudmore play a sunny poolside setting next weekend. His fourth record is currently in the works and has had two mixes recently released from TRUANTS and also through Is Burning with Servito.

“The list of things ahead of me seems daunting. Every weekend is like a new challenge. But would I rather be sitting in my office working on something I don’t believe in? No way.”

 

Wrecked: Octo Octa

NEW YORK CITY – For our only Wrecked @ Analog this Summer we welcome Octo Octa! Her new album on Honey Soundsystem’s HNYTRX label continues to be a crossover hit along with her solid past releases on such labels as 100% Silk, Argot, Running Back and more.

Additionally, earlier in the day we make our debut at PS1’s Warm Up so swing by there as well and make it a whole party day!
https://www.moma.org/calendar/events/3146?locale=en

With love,

Ryan & Ron

Wax Runoff: Bobb Deep [JSPRO-01]

After the unfortunate loss of Prodigy on June 20 I’ve been thinking a lot of Mobb Deep’s grand contributions to music and vinyl culture. Prodigy’s counterpart, Havoc, learned the art of MPC sampling around 1993 with help from infamous Q-Tip. In 1995 – smack dab in the middle of the golden age of hip-hop – The Infamous was released to major critical acclaim.

JSPRO-01

The genius behind the sampling was true to New York City form and undeniably classic. Growing up in New York during this time, it was hard to escape the now classic style cemented in legendary albums like the aforementioned, Nas’ Illmatic, and Notorious B.IG.’s Ready to Die. The producers behind these albums were masters of re-purposing old vinyl tracks for new life in rap, and I can recall it being some of the first impetus to buy vinyl at the flea markets in Chinatown.

As MPCs began to get traded in for Pro Tools, the essence and allure of hip-hop started to be diminished and eventually the golden era came to an end around the turn of the century; many people who were interested in the vinyl aspect of this music lost interest.

But those individuals and artists who are dedicated to a craft, and vinyl culture via production have dipped below the radar. Mixtapes played a major role in the underground music scene in New York during that time, and the ubiquity and ease of burning CDs expanded their reach from corners in Brooklyn to bodega counters across all boroughs. Big record execs with swollen dollar signs for pupils were unwilling to give “old” style mainstream exposure, and mixtapes became the main route of delivery for vinyl sampled music art.

Though I started to explore other genres, these mixtapes always made me smile, reminding me of some of the initial reasons I became infatuated with records and vinyl collecting. In 2005 I came across an unassuming mixtape CD in a West Bronx neighborhood that immediately piqued my interest. The artist credit read Bobb Deep in an identical font that I had seen on Mobb Deep sleeves prior. I brought Queensbridge Meets Kingston home with me and was instantly impressed with the creativity of the samples, and the depth of the drums that are hard to match without sampling vinyl.

The actual engineer behind this project was boom-bap saint DJ Swindle. He took most of the tracks from the heavily pressed and circulated Bob Marley Greatest Hits 12” Legend, and spliced it up to exist around Mobb Deep verses. I played the absolute hell out of this CD, and lost track of where it ended up by the end of high school. But the amazing sound on the record had forged an unforgettable niche in my brain.

Fast-forward to 2017 when I found myself at a rare and odd record fair searching out forgotten disco and funk. I came across a man from Chicago who specialized in impossible to find Japanese releases in mint condition. Flipping through his crate and scoffing at the prices, I was about to move on when I saw it. Bright green cover with the yellow lettering – how could I ever forget? I couldn’t believe it, but someone in Japan had commissioned an off-label pressing of Queensbridge Meets Kingston. Even though it was a tight groove LP (5 tracks on each side!) I had to have it. I managed to convince the Midwestern gentleman to let me have it for $50 and I was off racing back home to turn my amp up and melt into nostalgia.

While admittedly a couple of the tracks are in a way uninteresting, the greater core of the record sounded just as deep, rich, and full as I imagined. The titles of the tracks retained some of the best and most memorable Mobb Deep originals. The true aspect that made me fall in love with this record was how far the re-imagined compositions tended to exist from the originals. From the small guitar scale snippet on “Survival of the Fittest” to the drum ‘n’ bass structure of “Gangstaz Roll”, the record is a beautiful example of the place vinyl has in not only presentation, but also creation. The fact that someone in Japan felt the need to press a run of this record two years after it was released is a testament to how powerful the format can be for the people who can appreciate this music.

This record is essentially non-existent. It has never been sold on Discogs and prior to that record fair, I was unaware it even existed. There are three two-track singles that were released the same year of the CD via AV8, but I couldn’t imagine not enjoying this record from track as it was fully intended. Even so, these singles seem to be the only instances of Bobb Deep circulating on the internet.

The music world lost a great contributor and pioneer when Prodigy passed away last month. However, the inspiration he and Havoc left on youth and music producers resonates strongly. If they had never championed the vinyl sample sound, I don’t think DJ Swindle would have ever engaged in this project. But thanks to him, this stupid-rare gem will be out in the world, floating around, waiting to spellbind another music lover who refuses to dig anywhere except the deepest of crates.

Wax Runoff is a weekly feature that will showcase new finds and crate favorites. Nick States, of Boston, bought his first vinyl record in 2010 and has been hooked ever since. The record shop tends to be his first stop in an any city he visits.

2 Responsible: Project Pablo + Max McFerren

TORONTO – Deep Gold and Sidetrack bring you 2 Responsible featuring Project Pablo b2b Max McFerren.

Project Pablo
b2b2b2b2b
Max McFerren (DJ)

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Montreal-based DJ and musician Project Pablo has become something of a leader in Canada’s house music scene. Through strong releases on labels like 1080p, Magicwire, and Hybridity Music, his stock has risen, and in the last few years he has been all over Europe and North America for club and festival dates. Last year, his highly regarded 12” ‘Beaubien Dream’ is making waves on the newly minted Sounds of Beaubien Ouest label that he co-owns.

Max McFerren has been on a similar tear, recently returning from his debut Asia tour, and dropping killer tracks on labels 1080p, Don’t Be Afraid, and Allergy Season.

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Derek Plaslaiko

There is an undeniable passion that drives Derek Plaslaiko, a Detroit native who calls Berlin home base. With more than 20 years of touring internationally, playing extended sets, and producing tracks – in addition to balancing family life – he continues to grow as a beloved head in the scene.

Growing up just 20 minutes outside of Detroit proper, Plaslaiko’s youth was spent exploring and becoming heavily involved in the city’s circuit. He got his start around 1994 when Detroit’s house and techno scene was on a heavy up and he became crucial to both the Analog and Poorboy Parties, along with comrade Mike Servito.

An experience that really brought him into the realm was picking up a job at Record Time. Opened in 1983 by Mike Hime, the acclaimed music shop was a staple for local music lovers. With a couple different locations it became a place where many would converge to explore and discover the multitude of local sounds and music from abroad.

RECORD TIME DETROIT

RECORD TIME DETROIT

Plaslaiko started working at Record Time around Christmas 1996, he vaguely recalls. Hired by Mike Huckaby he says “I was only supposed to come on for the holidays, but then was kept on until summer 1998, I think? Somewhere around there.”

Other former employees include familiar names Claude Young, Rick Wilhite, Magda, Dan Bell and Rick Wade. The Dance Room at the Roseville location became known as a hub for collecting and selling records from numerous local house and techno producers. Plaslaiko says “the space was was usually pretty hilarious, too. Guys like Gary Chandler & DJ Dangerous would come in and crack jokes with Huck. Have you rolling on the floor laughing.”

Eventually, “I got let go for the same reason 99 percent of the people working there did: being late. They were super strict on it. Even if you were one minute late, then that would be strike one. I then went back to work at the Ferndale location around the spring of 2000 until spring of 2002,” he says. During his time there he was ordering for the dance catalog and remembers it being fun, seeing a range of characters walk through its doors. He commended the staff of Record Time saying it “was nice to see the hard work build into something special.”

The shop was influential in many facets for young Plaslaiko as his passion for music began to transform. “Working there was incredible! Both locations were phenomenal. This music was a lot harder to come by back then. So, working at the source really helped shape my musical tastes. Not to mention working around Mike Huckaby,” he says.

His employment at Record Time helped him earn his weekly residency at Family. Held at the pivotal Motor club tucked away in Hamtramck, this venue played an important role for the scene’s growth and was one of the longest running clubs in Detroit. Jason Kendig and Jeremy Christian were original Family residents. One night at a party in 1998 Plaslaiko found out Christian was leaving his spot and the event’s promoter Adriel Thornton had an opening to fill. Plaslaiko took to the helm and was a regular there for the next four years or so.

It was this residency that convinced Carl Craig to ask him to play the inaugural Detroit Electronic Movement Festival [DEMF], which eventually transitioned to be known today as Movement.

Throughout the years he has found himself playing the annual festival, other parties throughout Memorial Day Weekend and as a resident he can always be found at the otherworldly after-party No Way Back. That is of course with the exception of 2014 when he basically took the year off from DJing altogether with his son’s birth just four months prior. Regardless, experiencing basically every year since the millennium he has seen the festival’s evolution, which is now a pilgrimage for music lovers from around the globe.

PLASLAIKO @ NO WAY BACK – PHOTO BY AMY HUBBARD

“The festival has changed in so many different ways. I mean, the obvious one is that it used to be free. But that was never going to be able to sustain itself. Even still, you can’t beat that first year. The thing about it being free that made it so special was that people from absolutely every walk of life came down to check it out. Every race, every age – you name it and they were down there. But, you start putting a price tag on that, and it’s obviously going to change.”

Prices began increasing, but he says the biggest benefit to Paxahau taking over in 2006 and the higher price tag means a larger scale of production. “Doing something that big down there is a feat unlike any other. I’m super proud of all those guys for doing what they have done with it. And they really do strive to make it better and better every year. I often think they are going to plateau even with the sound systems, but they just keep getting bigger and better … It’s always going to be a super special weekend for me, and I don’t even plan to skip it again unless something major prevents me from going.”

In the summer of 2004 he needed a change of scenery and moved from Detroit to New York City. Eventually he met Bryan Kasenic and went on to become a now 10-year resident of The Bunker parties. During time spent in the city he started producing; his debut output xoxo, NYC  was a 12″ released in 2010 through Perc Trax. During that same year, he packed up again to move to Berlin and has since remained. In 2011 he spent a summer residency at Club der Visionaere and frequents the notable and legendary Tresor and Berghain/Panorama Bar among many others in Germany.

Although Berlin remains home he continues to travel extensively playing festivals such as Dimensions in Croatia, Communikey in Boulder, Harvest Festival in Toronto and Decibel in Seattle. He’s shared his music at beloved venues such as Smart Bar, Hot Mass, Good Room for The Bunker, Marble Bar – the list goes on and on.

DADDY PLASLAIKO

DEREK PLASLAIKO & ELLIOT – PHOTO COURTESY OF MOVEMENT

Still, he maintains his traveling lifestyle as a DJ and balances life at home with his wife Heidi and his son Elliot. Such dedication is no easy feat and I find incredible appreciation for people who are so passionate about their music and are still growing a family. Someone else whom I admire for exactly that is Chicago’s Sam Kern, otherwise known as Sassmouth, who is also good friend of his. I couldn’t help but wonder what sentiments parent DJs must share with one another.

“God, I love Sam Kern. She was actually just in Berlin with Ryan [her husband] and Amelia [her daughter] and we got some great hang time in. I really try my hardest to not let my ‘career’ affect my family life in Berlin. I’ve definitely been more selective of my gigs these days and also very cautious about spending too much time away from home. DJing might be considered a job that I’m doing, but there is no denying that there is quite a bit of fun being had. I tend to feel a bit guilty about it, and feel it’s maybe a bit unfair to Heidi if she’s left to all of the parental duties while I’m out partying in multiple cities for 2-3 weekends in a row. Despite all of that, she is incredibly supportive and is even encouraging me to go out on the road more this next year.”

Elliott will be three in January and since he spends time in daycare and preschool (Kita in Germany) Plaslaiko says things are becoming a bit easier to manage. His wife is able to work consistently at her day job, “so me being gone doesn’t affect her like it would have a year ago,” he says. “Though, I’m sure the early mornings every single day probably wear on her a bit. But, all in all, I’m just trying to weigh everything out so that I’m still doing my part, so to speak. Elliott is at an age where he’s constantly doing new things that are super impressive, so it hurts to be away and missing a lot of these first time moments. I also miss them terribly within two days of being gone. Even writing this, I’ve been gone four full days and it feels like weeks. And I have eight more days to go. So, in short, yeah it’s quite hard to be away from them. Luckily with Skype I can stay a bit connected to them while I’m touring. I have no idea how people would’ve done this 15 years ago!”

For the last stop on his tour he will hit Rochester, NY for the first time at Signal > Noise, which has seen the likes of The Black Madonna, Claude Young, Norm Talley, Mike Servito and more. For a man with more than 20 years of dance floors under his belt he has seen a variety of spaces and crowds. I inquired about his reflections on small city scenes.

“I have never been one to shy away from playing someplace just because it’s scene is ‘small’.  In fact, I’m always looking for more cities that fit that description. For years, I have had the approach of hoping to help build something somewhere. It’s important for a scene’s growth to have people come in from outside of the local community and (hopefully) provide a different experience, and possibly inspire those in that community.” – DEREK PLASLAIKO

For almost every DJ that has spoken with Sequencer regarding their insight on intimate crowds and concentrated music scenes the consensus seems to continue. “And smaller scenes usually have some of (like you said) the most passionate crowds. The first two that come to mind are Pittsburgh and Philly! Small scenes for the most part, but I can come in and do seven hours at Hot Mass, or thirteen hours at Inciting HQ and have some of the most engaged dancers I have seen anywhere else in my life! I’ve heard nothing but great things about what has been going on in Rochester, and I’ve been looking forward to it for months now.”

What can we look forward to seeing from Plaslaiko in the future? “I have The Bunker 14 Year Anniversary coming up in January! Definitely looking forward to that. Also, I did a remix for TB Arthur that will be out in late January. I’m also going into the studio with BMG right after I finish this interview, so that’s exciting too!”

Wax Runoff: Krimp [SR 12440]

Any DJ or avid record collector will agree, it pays to explore the back catalogs of record labels. For me, that’s been the case with classic New York house label Strictly Rhythm. While I’ve always carried a couple choice cuts from the label in my bag, revisiting their output frequently has helped me expand my horizons and pick up records I may have passed on merely six months prior.

Krimp, Dana Kelley, Strictly Rhythym

SR 12440

Such is the case with a recent score of House of Pain / In The Spirit by Krimp, aka Dana Kelley. Originally from Boston, Mass. Kelley is known for his output of classic deep house and garage tunes, under a number of different aliases, on labels such as Strictly Rhythm, Guidance, and Large. Sadly Kelley passed away in 2013, however, his music lives on in this week’s Wax Runoff.

Opening up the record is the Citrus Mix of “House Of Pain”. A moody late-night jam, this one starts out smooth before layering a number of textures and building tension. While “The Clouds Mix” retains much of the character of the previous mix, the drum beat has a bit more theme to it and the synth has all the hallmarks of a session jam. Crafting a sort of wonky organ style sound, this one has me very excited to play out. On the other side of the record we have two mixes of “In The Spirit”. The first (and my favorite of the release) is the “In The Spirit Mix”. Starting out with a simple, yet effective bassline, the addition of some mellow keys push this into true old school deep house territory. When this one starts lifting off, it feels like the vocal calling out “in the spirit” is the only thing keeping you grounded. Closing out the release is “In the Spirit (The Perk-Us-On Mix)”. Again, the inside track is much dancier with this one having considerably more drive and at times feeling almost like an old techno track. Given the context of the backing track the vocal evokes a completely different feeling.

Being an older Strictly Rhythm release, this is one of those records that you may just get lucky with when digging in a bin somewhere that hasn’t been too picked over. If you’re interested in grabbing your own copy, there’s plenty on Discogs at a reasonable price, but it looks like you’ll have to pay the shipping from Europe.

Wax Runoff is a weekly feature that will showcase new finds and crate favorites. Colin Boardway, of Chicago, is the label manager for Yoruba Records. He has spent the last 10 years developing his sound by digging deep in the bins wherever records are sold.

Max McFerren

Like most New Yorkers, Max McFerren is constantly grinding just trying to survive. A South Carolina native with a background in music education, he moved to NYC in 2008 where he began establishing himself further as a DJ and a producer.

Residents of the city are always finding a place to live within their means as the areas and boroughs evolve in cost of living. McFerren currently lives in Chinatown which he says seems to be more affordable than Bushwick, where he spends a chunk of time at Bossa Nova Civic Club. “NYC is such a hard city to survive in. I think you can get addicted to the constant hustle. Being around other DJs/producers who are also making it is super motivating and maybe also a bit enabling,” he says. “I spent most of this past year hiding out, but there is such a strong community here, and I think it’s all centered around a positive ‘fuck it all’ attitude rather than any single ‘sound.’  I think we all just get so wrapped up in surviving and it becomes a part of our identity.”

Starting at a young age he began producing in high school and delved deeper into house, techno and the club scene a bit later on. His early days exploring creativity were spent just recording things onto a computer and playing with sound. The concept of freedom while producing became a driving force. He says, “When me and my buddies would listen to someone like Aphex Twin I think we would give it the same attention as any other recording artist. It was like, ‘you get 78 minutes on the CD to do whatever you want, what are you gonna do?'” The 1992 release Selected Ambient Works 85-92 by the aforementioned and Prodigy’s Music for the Jilted Generation are two very influential albums for McFerren.

After high school he decided to follow the path to Berklee College of Music in Boston, Mass. Higher education in music is a privilege that many do not have access to, especially within the electronic scene. A world frequented with self-taught artists and many who learn to mix or produce by engaging in the creative cloud.

“I think it’s really important to try and give back somehow and engage people who don’t have the resources available. Obviously big institutions don’t exist without funding, but there are other ways. Start small and engage people who want to know things that you know. Share your life with them. Show them possibilities. At the same time I love to talk about music, but I hate the idea of forcing people to do everything my way. It’s so important to understand the idea of process and figure things out yourself. Ask your own questions and take constructive feedback. All of this is hard and I suck at it but it’s true. Be yourself.” – MAX MCFERREN

He began DJing around 2008 when he moved to the city. His friends ran a basement loft in Brooklyn called The Cave and he also played a monthly at Tandem Bar. But he soon established a residency at Bossa Nova Civic Club after his friend Erika Ceruzzi asked him to DJ a party called Worldwave. He says the party was “pretty mixed up sound wise, but that was cool for me because I wasn’t a part of L.I.E.S. or any other established techno thing. Also involved in that party is a dude named Julian Duron, who is a creative consultant for Bossa under his now defunct company Sisterjam (look out for his Creative Support Group coming soon) and now also releases music as Earth Boys with Michael Sherburn.” McFerren began connecting with the club’s regulars and became close friends with Duron, Bossa’s owner John Barclay and the staff. Becoming more involved with booking in 2014 he finds himself closing out the night. “Closing Bossa is probably the most fun I’ve ever had in my life. It has definitely shaped who I am as a DJ today. I hope I can continue to grow with them,” he says.

complete walkthru max mcferren

MAX MCFERREN – COMPLETE WALKTHRU

Whether performing or producing the NYC artist finds himself inspired by dancing, DJing, the city, friends and lovers, “and more recently just trying to heal” – something we can all relate to. His sound is risky and very human. His edge he says “has always been experimental music mixed 75 percent well.” Currently he has three full-length tapes and one 12″ on Vancouver label 1080p as well as a 12″ and a few other compilations on Allergy Season. Additionally, South London Ordnance caught wind of McFerren’s record Shoot the Lobster and recruited him to his newest label, Aery Metals. Now at a musical crossroads McFerren says he will be focusing on his newest alias Complete Walkthru. “There will be some cool 12″s coming out next year and I’ll probably start working on an emotional full length soon,” he says.

What can you expect from a Max McFerren set? “Context is everything,” he says. “I always try to imagine where I’m playing and who will be there, and how long, and why, and just – everything. I hardly ever play by the numbers which is why it’s usually a varied mood.” Catch him tonight Oct. 15 in Buffalo, NY for the next installation of Strange Allure along with Discwoman’s Umfang. “[We] were discussing going all in with techno and experimental electronic music, so it will probably be very confrontational. But we are multi-dimensional people so who knows!”