Sound Devices: Why JeffRepeater Loves His Native Instruments Maschine

JeffRepeater is a local DJ and electronic music producer.

“Native Instruments Maschine is a software and hardware hybrid which provides for a flexible creative audio environment. The MIDI and sampling capabilities allow me to keep innovating creatively. It is also usable in the studio with the Maschine software for producing and also to trigger cue points and FX in the Traktor DJ software to play live, or any other MIDI capabilities for that matter.” – JeffRepeater

Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why wZa Loves His Custom Roland MV-8800

wZa is hip-hop producer and member of the Buffalo-based hip-hop groups Radarada and Death Picnic. His solo debut full length, AzN CHiKz, comes out this winter.

“I love this piece of equipment because it is very versatile and has it’s own unique sound. Not a lot of other beatmakers I know use one as their main piece of gear, so it helps separate my sound from other producer’s sound. It’s also great because it works perfectly for live performance with the bands I play in — Radarada and Death Picnic. It’s great in the studio or my bedroom when I’m making my own beats. I also love it because it has my own design to it, so when I play it, I feel pretty cool.” – wZa

Editor’s note: Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why Andy Czuba Loves His Om-Bot Psychic Cell Doom Wave Fold Noise Synth

Andy Czuba is a noise artist and Sugar City volunteer. His projects include La Parka, a collaborative noise music project with Bobby Griffiths/VWLS, and Flesh Trade, his solo noise project.

“I discovered the Om-Bot Psychic Cells two years ago. They are the creations of Shane Vannest/Strangecraft, a sound artist, sculptor, and mask maker from Pittsburgh/now Las Vegas. Upon first seeing images and footage of the synths, I knew I had to own one. Two years later and I own six. They are part noise makers, part art, part puzzles. The Doom Wave Fold has proven to be my favorite one thus far. It has had the most use and I’m still discovering new sounds within it. I’ve used it in every one of my set ups since purchasing it. It works by employing multiple waveforms and oscillators which can be unleashed by connecting alligator clips to the exposed posts and then tweaking the knobs and waveform selectors. I’ve achieved cavernous crackles that fade out like shooting stars, unearthly drones, and spastic random chaos that I crave in my audio endeavors — a truly unique piece of gear from a highly underrated artist. The Doom Wave Fold and it’s brethren have and continue to be one of the largest impacts on my audio pursuits and that’s why it is a favorite of mine.” – Andy Czuba

Editor’s note: Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why Sparklebomb Loves Her Casio SK-1

Sparklebomb is Angie Conte, an electronic music producer from Buffalo. Her most recent release is a full length cassette tape titled “Bring In The Night.”

“It looks like it’s for babies, but the Casio SK-1 has 13 different envelope filters, a sampler, and the most fantastic voices. If you’ve ever listened to Sparklebomb, you’ll know that the haunting pipe organ and spacey brass ensemble voices have both been staples in mostly all of my songs and live performances. Little money was spent on my SK-1 but I have spent quite a bit more on the effects pedals, which I use to enhance its existing beauty. With the right tools, I can make it sound like a grand pipe organ or a synthesizer you’d hear featured in the score of a classic horror film. I’ve manipulated my SK-1 into a monster and I’ll love it until I’m dead.” – Angie Conte

Editor’s note: Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why Space Cubs loves her $10 Cassette Player

Suzanne Lee Bonifacio is Space Cubs, a Buffalo-based electronic music producer. Her latest track, “Pearls” is out now on the L.A.-based label Unspeakable Records.

“Reason is the program that is synthesis has never failed me. I’ve been using it since I started and adore the built in instruments and pretty much only stick to those for my MIDI instruments. AKG is the mic I prefer, as well, for it’s warmth and ageless tone. It just picks up all the nuances and is my closest musical friend. Lastly, this $10 cassette player has aided me on some rad ventures lately. It’s not even a 4-track, but I’ve been using it to record a lot recently. It’s been a ton of fun and even picks up some radio frequencies and buzzes to mess around with. Music comes from music maker, so I am a firm believer in utilizing whatever you have, even a cheap cassette player.” – Suzanne Bonifacio

Editor’s note: Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why Khari Waits Loves His BOSS DR-670

Khari Waits is a Buffalo-based hip hop artist who goes by the name Coleman J. Brahski. He’s also in a few hardcore bands, including BastardBastardBastard and On Point.

“My BOSS DR-670 was the first stand alone drum machine I got my hands on and used it to produce my first rap project. What I loved most about this box is how overtly digital it sounded. A lot of drum machines will try to sound realistic, but the DR-670 doesn’t – it knows that it’s a simulation. I relied on it exclusively because I went to a Jack Topht show years ago and saw him do his set from his [Roland] SP-404. I didn’t want to bite his technique outright, but I knew that I wanted to perform with hardware so I could enhance my live shows. Being broke kind of limited what gear I could really get my hands on, but luckily Allentown Music had a DR-670 for like, less than $100, so I snagged it. It’s small enough that I don’t need to lug a lot of gear to a show.” – Khari Waits

Editor’s note: Each week, Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Sound Devices: Why Lesionread Loves Their Homemade Travel-Sized Studio

Editor’s note: Each week Cory Perla of The Public asks a local musician to tell us why they love their favorite piece of gear.

Lesionread is an electronic music producer from Buffalo. He just finished a cross country tour.

“I love my case because it’s an ‘all-in-one’ portable recording studio. It’s got a lid and wheels attached, and it’s just the right size to fit in my car. My favorite thing to do is while touring, meeting other musicians in each city and hooking ’em into my box so we can record tunes on the fly.” — Lesionread

Sound Devices: Why Cory Loves His MicroKorg

Welcome to Sound Devices. My name is Cory Perla, music editor at The Public. This is how this column will work: each week, we’ll feature a piece of gear that one local electronic music maker loves. The gear featured here might be vintage, homemade, or brand spanking new, and we’ll ask one simple question about it: Why do you love it?

I’ll go first.

“I bought this [MicroKorg] synthesizer about 10 years ago to use in a band I was in at the time. We just wanted a way to add a layer of noise to our songs, and this guy did the job. I never mastered it; I suppose it’s not too late. What I honestly love about it is the character. I unearthed this last week after it sat in an extra room, unused, for a couple of years. I forget how that key in the middle popped out, but I do know that strip of duct tape with the notes for each key written on it has been on there since the day I got it.”